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Research Papers: Applications

Three-Dimensional Heat Transfer Analysis of Pin-Bushing System With Oscillatory Motion: Theory and Experiment

[+] Author and Article Information
Jun Wen

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, 2508 Patrick Taylor Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70808

M. M. Khonsari1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, 2508 Patrick Taylor Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70808khonsari@me.lsu.edu

D. Y. Hua

 Caterpillar Inc., Technical Center Building E-854, P.O. Box 1875, Peoria, IL 61656-1875

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 133(1), 011101 (Dec 03, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002729 History: Received October 29, 2008; Revised March 31, 2009; Published December 03, 2010; Online December 03, 2010

A three-dimensional computational thermal contact model is developed. The approach utilizes a combination of the transfer matrix and finite element methods. The frictional heat generated at the contact interface is instantaneously partitioned between the bushing and the shaft. Two methods to couple the heat and temperature at the contact interface are presented. One method automatically accounts for the heat division between contacting bodies by satisfying the heat equilibrium and temperature continuity at interactive surfaces. The other method introduces a fictitious layer between contacting bodies with a specified gap conductance to partition the frictional heat. Application of the model to the heat transfer analysis of journal bearing systems experiencing oscillatory motion is presented. Nonuniformly distributed frictional heat along the axial direction is considered. The model is capable of predicting the transient temperature field for journal bearings. It can also be used to determine the maximum contact temperature, which is difficult to be measured experimentally. Comparison of the simulated resulted along with experimental tests conducted in a laboratory is presented.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

A shaft-bushing system

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Figure 2

Pair of contact elements between the shaft and bushing

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Figure 3

Flow chart of the simulation algorithm

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Figure 4

(a) 3D FEM model used by the present method and (b) 2D FEM model used by ABAQUS

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Figure 5

(a) Comparison of surface temperature variation up to 400 s and (b) comparison of surface temperature variation in two cycles at steady state between the present method and ABAQUS for unidirectional heat source

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Figure 6

Temperature rise at steady state (a) by the present method and (b) by ABAQUS for unidirectional sliding heat source

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Figure 7

(a) Comparison of surface temperature variation up to 200 s and (b) comparison of surface temperature variation in two cycles at steady state between the present method and ABAQUS for oscillatory heat source

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Figure 8

Temperature rise at steady state (a) by the present method and (b) by ABAQUS for oscillatory heat source

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Figure 9

Schematic of experimental apparatus of bushing tester. (1) load cell, (2) linkage bar, (3) thermal couples, (4) shaft, (5) bushing, (6) housing, (7) guiding poles, (8) computer system, and (9) load applying device.

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Figure 10

Locations of thermal couples on the central cross section of the bushing

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Figure 11

Modeled components

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Figure 12

Finite element model

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Figure 13

von Mises stress for shaft

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Figure 14

von Mises stress for bushing

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Figure 15

Contact pressure

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Figure 16

Four-bar-linkage mechanism

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Figure 17

Angular velocity of the shaft in one oscillatory cycle

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Figure 18

Friction variation over oscillation cycles

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Figure 19

Temperature rise for shaft at steady state

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Figure 20

Temperature rise for bushing at steady state: (a) inner surface temperature and (b) outer surface temperature

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Figure 21

Variation of temperature rise

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