0
Research Papers: Applications

Dynamic Modeling of Rolling Element Bearings With Surface Contact Defects Using Bond Graphs

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohsen Nakhaeinejad

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712mohsenn@mail.utexas.edu

Michael D. Bryant

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712mbryant@mail.utexas.edu

J. Tribol 133(1), 011102 (Dec 15, 2010) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003088 History: Received June 24, 2010; Revised November 17, 2010; Published December 15, 2010; Online December 15, 2010

Multibody dynamics of healthy and faulty rolling element bearings were modeled using vector bond graphs. A 33 degree of freedom (DOF) model was constructed for a bearing with nine balls and two rings (11 elements). The developed model can be extended to a rolling element bearing with n elements and (3×n) DOF in planar and (6×n) DOF in three dimensional motions. The model incorporates the gyroscopic and centrifugal effects, contact elastic deflections and forces, contact slip, contact separations, and localized faults. Dents and pits on inner race and outer race and balls were modeled through surface profile changes. Bearing load zones under various radial loads and clearances were simulated. The effects of type, size, and shape of faults on the vibration response in rolling element bearings and dynamics of contacts in the presence of localized faults were studied. Experiments with healthy and faulty bearings were conducted to validate the model. The proposed model clearly mimics healthy and faulty rolling element bearings.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Geometry and coordinates of a three-body rolling element system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Geometry of two curved bodies (a) and (b) in contact under the normal force F

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

(a) Subsurface-initiated fatigue spall (31), (b) outer race fault model, and (c) cross section of an outer race fault

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Four parameters Tf, w, h, rf, and βf represent the type, size, shape, and location of faults in the model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Dynamics of a rigid body under external loads are represented with a diamond-shape vector bond graph model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Rolling element bearing with single roller: (a) bearing with housing, (b) system with external loads and constraints, (c) free body diagram, and (d) bond graph models of each element and contacts

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Simulation versus experiment: vibration response of bearing with outer race faults (fault size: w×h=2.7×1.0 mm2). ((a) and (d)) Time response, ((b) and (e)) time response (magnified), and ((c) and (f)) vibration power spectrum (shaft speed: 35 Hz)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Radial deflection versus speed for a roller bearing. The centrifugal force on rollers increases contact loads and radial deflections when shaft speed increases. Simulations are compared with the results of Harris (35).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Vibration response of a bearing with IRF for different fault severities: w×h=1×0.5 (level I), 1.42×0.71 (level II), 2.82×1.41 (level I) (mm2), and fr=35 Hz

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Vibration response of a bearing with ORF for different fault severities: w×h=1×0.5 (level I), 1.42×0.71 (level II), 2.82×1.41 (level I) (mm2), and fr=35 Hz

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Vibration responses of faulty bearings (IRF, BF, and ORF) with different fault shapes, fr=35 Hz

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Faults in rolling element generate impacts, which can cause contact separations. (a) Force and displacement at inner race-ball contact, (b) force and displacement at ball-outer race contact, and (c) outer race vibration (ball fault: w×h=1.42×0.71 mm2 engaged at inner race-ball contact, fr=35 Hz).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Simulation results: effects of clearance and radial loads on load distribution in rolling element bearings. (a) 0.08 mm clearance, (b) 0 clearance, and (c) 0.02 mm preload.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Test bed for bearing experiments

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Vibration response of a bearing with BFs for different fault severities: w×h=1×0.5 (level I), 1.42×0.71 (level II), 2.82×1.41 (level I) (mm2), and fr=35 Hz

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Simulation versus experiment: vibration response of bearing with ball faults (fault size: w×h=1.0×0.8 mm2). ((a) and (d)) Time response, ((b) and (e)) time response (magnified), and ((c) and (f)) vibration power spectrum (shaft speed: 35 Hz).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Simulation versus experiment: Vertical vibration response of the bearing with inner race fault (fault size: w×h=3×1 mm2). Fault is located at the load zone (down). ((a) and (d)) Time response, ((b) and (e)) time response (magnified), and ((c) and (f)) vibration power spectrum (shaft speed: 35 Hz).

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In