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Research Papers: Other (Seals, Manufacturing)

Surface Defect Generation and Recovery in Cold Rolling of Stainless Steel Strips

[+] Author and Article Information
E. Mancini1

Dipartimento di Meccanica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, I-60131 Ancona, Italyedoardo.mancini@uniroma1.it

M. Sasso

Dipartimento di Meccanica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, I-60131 Ancona, Italym.sasso@univpm.it

D. Amodio

Dipartimento di Meccanica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, I-60131 Ancona, Italyd.amodio@univpm.it

R. Ferretti

 Centro Sviluppo Materiali, viale B. Brin, 218-05100 Terni, Italyr.ferretti@c-s-m.it

F. Sanfilippo

 Centro Sviluppo Materiali, viale B. Brin, 218-05100 Terni, Italyf.sanfilippo@c-s-m.it

1

Corresponding author. Present address: Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Roma, Italy.

J. Tribol 133(1), 012202 (Dec 02, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002218 History: Received February 05, 2010; Revised July 16, 2010; Published December 02, 2010; Online December 02, 2010

Previously, researchers investigated the mechanism of surface defect evolution in rolling. It was highlighted how the lubricant plays an essential role for the final strip surface quality. In some cases the lubricant can be entrapped in pits or in other defects where hydrostatic pressure tends to prevent its elimination; however, when some favorable conditions are satisfied, the lubricant can be drawn out by hydrodynamic actions and defects can be recovered. This mechanism has been described as microplastohydrodynamic lubrication (MPHL) and recent studies report a suitable parameter (the ratio of the oil drawn out from the pit to the initial pit volume) as MPHL characterization coefficient. The present paper deals with the recovery of isolated surface defects in the Sendzimir rolling process of AISI 304 stainless steel; the analyses have been conducted on two rolling conditions, which although quite similar, regularly showed opposite capability of defect recovery, moreover, with a trend that is in contrast with the predictions made by standard MPHL. Two effects, which are usually ignored in literature modeling, have been considered in this work: The former is the back-tension, which has relevant outcome on the contact pressure and the latter is the position of the neutral point, which cannot be assumed to lie at the end of the roll bite. The analytical treatment was supported by FEM simulations, which permitted to put realistic data into the MPHL equations, thus, to explain the experimental behavior. The analysis was then validated with two further rolling schedules that seem to confirm the proposed approach.

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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Surface defects on the sheet after the rolling process

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Figure 2

Scheme of MPHL mechanism

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Figure 3

Schematic representation of microplastohydrodynamic lubrication

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Figure 4

Strip surface before cold rolling: (a) surface aspect and (b) surface profile

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Figure 5

Strip surface after a “correct” cold rolling: (a) surface aspect and (b) surface profile

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Figure 6

Stress-strain curves: tensile and compression tests (AISI 304)

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Figure 9

(a) Sliding speed for rolling schedule 1 and (b) sliding speed for rolling schedule 2

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Figure 7

Activation of MPHL in the forward (A-B) and backward (C-D) zones

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Figure 10

(a) Contact normal stress (from FEM) and (b) von Mises stress (from FEM)

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Figure 11

(a) Film thickness for schedule 1 and (b) film thickness for schedule 2

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Figure 12

(a) Λm parameter for schedule 1 and (b) Λm parameter for schedule 2

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