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Technical Briefs

Influence of Inclination Angle and Machining Direction on Friction and Transfer Layer Formation

[+] Author and Article Information
Pradeep L. Menezes1

Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, Indiamenezesp@uwm.edu

Kishore

Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India

Satish V. Kailas

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India

Michael R. Lovell

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201

1

Corresponding author. Present address: Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201.

J. Tribol 133(1), 014501 (Dec 02, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002604 History: Received January 20, 2010; Revised September 07, 2010; Published December 02, 2010; Online December 02, 2010

In the present investigation, unidirectional grinding marks were created on a set of steel plates. Sliding experiments were then conducted with the prepared steel plates using Al–Mg alloy pins and an inclined pin-on-plate sliding tester. The goals of the experiments were to ascertain the influence of inclination angle and grinding mark direction on friction and transfer layer formation during sliding contact. The inclination angle of the plate was held at 0.2 deg, 0.6 deg, 1 deg, 1.4 deg, 1.8 deg, 2.2 deg, and 2.6 deg in the tests. The pins were slid both perpendicular and parallel to the grinding marks direction. The experiments were conducted under both dry and lubricated conditions on each plate in an ambient environment. Results showed that the coefficient of friction and the formation of transfer layer depend on the grinding marks direction and inclination angle of the hard surfaces. For a given inclination angle, under both dry and lubricated conditions, the coefficient of friction and transfer layer formation were found to be greater when the pins slid perpendicular to the unidirectional grinding marks than when the pins slid parallel to the grinding marks. In addition, a stick-slip phenomenon was observed under lubricated conditions at the highest inclination angle for sliding perpendicular to the grinding marks direction. This phenomenon could be attributed to the extent of plane strain conditions taking place at the asperity level during sliding.

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References

Figures

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Figure 1

3D profiles of unidirectionally ground steel plate

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Figure 2

(a) Photograph of pin-on-plate sliding tester and (b) schematic diagram of pin-on-plate with inclined steel plate

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Figure 3

Variation of forces and coefficient of friction with sliding distance; sliding direction is perpendicular to the unidirectional grinding marks

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Figure 4

Variation of coefficient of friction with sliding distance when Al–Mg alloy pins slide against steel plates at different inclination angles under (a) dry and (b) lubricated conditions; here, the sliding direction is perpendicular to the unidirectional grinding marks.

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Figure 5

Variation of coefficient of friction with sliding distance when Al-Mg alloy pins slide against steel plates at different inclination angles under (a) dry and (b) lubricated conditions; Sliding direction is parallel to the unidirectional grinding marks

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Figure 6

Variation of coefficient of friction with inclination angles under dry and lubricated conditions

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Figure 7

Backscattered scanning electron micrographs of steel plates after sliding tests under dry conditions at (a) 0.2 deg and (b) 2.2 deg inclination angles and under lubricated conditions at (c) 0.2 deg and (d) 2.2 deg inclination angles. Sliding direction is perpendicular to the unidirectional grinding marks. The arrows indicate the sliding direction of the pin relative to the plate.

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Figure 8

Backscattered scanning electron micrographs of steel plates after sliding tests under dry conditions at (a) 0.2 deg and (b) 2.2 deg inclination angles and under lubricated conditions at (c) 0.2 deg and (d) 2.2 deg inclination angles. Sliding direction is parallel to the unidirectional grinding marks. The arrows indicate the sliding direction of the pin relative to the plate.

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Figure 9

Scanning electron micrographs of the pins slid at a 2.6 deg inclination angle perpendicular to the unidirectional grinding marks under (a) dry and (b) lubricated conditions and pins slid at a 2.6 deg inclination angle parallel to the unidirectional grinding marks under (c) dry and (d) lubricated conditions. The arrows indicate the sliding direction of the plate relative to the pin.

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Figure 10

Variation of different components of friction with inclination angle

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