0
Research Papers: Applications

Investigation of the High Speed Rolling Bearing Temperature Rise With Oil-Air Lubrication

[+] Author and Article Information
Shuyun Jiang

School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, 2 Southeast Road, Jiangning District, Nanjing 211189, Chinajiangshy@seu.edu.cn

Hebing Mao

School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, 2 Southeast Road, Jiangning District, Nanjing 211189, China

J. Tribol 133(2), 021101 (Mar 18, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003501 History: Received June 12, 2010; Revised January 14, 2011; Published March 18, 2011; Online March 18, 2011

The oil-air lubrication system has been widely used for rolling ball bearing. However, as the rotation speed increases, the temperature rise will increase dramatically, resulting in shortening the service life of the ball bearing. The existing literature has offered valuable fundamental data about the oil-air lubrication of rolling bearing; however, there are still some problems that concerned the oil-air lubrication, which are not addressed. In this study, an experiment setup to investigate the oil-air lubrication for the high speed ball bearing has been developed, and performance tests of hybrid ceramic and steel ball bearings under the extensive operating conditions including oil-air supply pipe length, bearing preload, lube interval, oil type, oil viscosity, nozzle design, and rotation speed have been conducted. The test results show that the bearing has the lowest temperature rise with the pipe length of 1.5 m. For the steel ball bearing, the proper preload decreases with increasing of the rotating speed, and the temperature rise of the hybrid ceramic ball bearing is not sensitive to the axial preload. There exists a proper amount of lubricant for the bearing at each rotational speed; and a larger amount of lubricant is required for the bearing as the rotating speed increases. The tested bearings under different speeds have almost the same lowest temperature rise under the lubricant with the viscosity of 100 cSt; a higher or lower viscosity will increase the bearing temperature rises. The nozzle design is an important factor to affect the temperature rise of the ball bearing, and the suitable geometric parameter of the nozzle is closely related to the cage landing method of the bearing. The temperature rise of tested bearings increases with the increase in the rotation speed; and the hybrid ceramic ball bearing always has a lower temperature rise than that of the steel ball bearing at the same operating conditions.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Experiment setup: (a) schematic view and (b) photo

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Cross-section drawing of the oil-air nozzle

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Effect of oil-air supply pipe length on temperature rise of tested bearings

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Effect of preload on temperature rise of tested bearings: (a) steel ball bearing and (b) ceramic ball bearing

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Effect of lube interval on temperature rise of tested bearings: (a) steel ball bearing and (b) ceramic ball bearing

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Effect of oil viscosity on temperature rise of tested bearings: (a) at 20,000 rpm and (b) at 30,000 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Effect of distances between ball surface and nozzle outlet on temperature rises of tested bearings with an inner ring directed nozzle

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Schematic view of the bearing with an inner ring directed nozzle: (a) ceramic bearing (outer ring landing) and (b) steel bearing (inner ring landing)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Schematic view of the bearing with an outer ring directed nozzle: (a) ceramic bearing (outer ring landing) and (b) steel bearing (inner ring landing)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Effect of distance between ball surface and nozzle outlet on temperature rise of tested bearings with an outer ring directed nozzle

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Effect of the length to outer-diameter ratio of the outlet on temperature rise of tested bearings

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Effect of outlet number on temperature rise of tested bearings

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Effect of rotation speed on temperature rise of tested bearings

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In