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Research Papers: Applications

Effects of Grease Types on Vibration and Acoustic Emission of Defective Linear-Guideway Type Recirculating Ball Bearings

[+] Author and Article Information
Hiroyuki Ohta

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188, Japanohta@mech.nagaokaut.ac.jp

Shinya Hayashi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188, Japan

Soichiro Kato

LG Technology Department, NSK Precision Co. Ltd., 78 Toriba, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8527, Japan

Yutaka Igarashi

Research Department, NSK Precision Co. Ltd., 78 Toriba, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8527, Japan

Ball circulation collisions are the collisions between balls and other parts caused by the ball circulation.

This tester was developed with reference to that in Ref. 40.

J. Tribol 133(2), 021102 (Mar 22, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003302 History: Received April 05, 2010; Revised December 03, 2010; Published March 22, 2011; Online March 22, 2011

This paper deals with effects of grease types on vibrations and acoustic emissions (AEs) of linear-guideway type recirculating ball bearings with a millimeter-sized artificial defect in the carriage. First, the vibration and AE of one normal bearing without a defect (Type N) and six defective bearings (Types D1–D6) were measured using a linear velocity of 1 m/s. Three types of grease are used for the lubrication of test bearings. The experimental results show that the vibration and AE amplitudes (the pulse amplitudes, the root-mean-square (RMS) values, and component amplitudes in the spectra) of both the normal and defective bearings have a tendency to be reduced when a grease with higher base oil viscosity is used. Under the same type of grease, the RMS values of the vibrations and AE of the defective bearings increase as the defect angle increases. However, the increases of the RMS values due to increased defect angle (the increasing rates of the RMS values) are reduced when a grease with higher base oil viscosity is used. To explain these experimental results, grease impact tests are carried out. The grease impact tests show that a grease with higher base oil viscosity reduces the impact velocity and the maximum impact forces. This implies that a grease with higher base oil viscosity generate greater viscous resistance to balls in the test bearings then reduces the ball impact forces in the ball circulation collisions and ball-defect collisions. Because of the reduction of the ball impact forces, both the vibration and AE amplitudes as well as the increasing rate of the RMS values are reduced.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Location of carriage defect and defect angle θd

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Figure 3

Electron micrograms of thickeners of grease

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Figure 4

Experimental apparatus

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Figure 5

Time waveforms of test bearings

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Figure 6

RMS values of vibrations and AE versus base oil viscosity of grease

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Figure 7

RMS values of vibrations and AE versus defect angle

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Figure 8

Frequency spectra

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Figure 9

Grease impact test

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Figure 10

Impact force and gap obtained by grease impact test

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Figure 11

Effects of base oil viscosity of grease on maximum impact force and impact velocity in grease impact test

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Figure 12

Average values of maximum impact force and impact velocity in grease impact test

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