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Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Fretting Wear Modeling of Coated and Uncoated Surfaces Using the Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Benjamin D. Leonard

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1288bdleonar@purdue.edu

Pankaj Patil

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1288pmpatil@purdue.edu

Trevor S. Slack

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1288tslack@purdue.edu

Farshid Sadeghi

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1288sadeghi@ecn.purdue.edu

Sachin Shinde

 Siemens Energy Inc., Orlando, FL 32826sachin.shinde@siemens.com

Marc Mittelbach

 Siemens AG, 45473 Muelheim, Germanymarc.mittelbach@siemens.com

J. Tribol 133(2), 021601 (Mar 17, 2011) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003482 History: Received May 03, 2010; Revised January 05, 2011; Published March 17, 2011; Online March 17, 2011

A new approach for modeling fretting wear in a Hertzian line contact is presented. The combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM) in which multiple finite element bodies interact as distinct bodies is used to model a two-dimensional fretting contact with and without coatings. The normal force and sliding distance are used during each fretting cycle, and fretting wear is modeled by locally applying Archard’s wear equation to determine wear loss along the surface. The FDEM is validated by comparing the pressure and frictional shear stress results to the continuum mechanics solution for a Hertzian fretting contact. The dependence of the wear algorithm stability on the cycle increment of a fretting simulation is also investigated. The effects of friction coefficient, normal force, displacement amplitude, coating thickness, and coating modulus of elasticity on fretting wear are presented.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

In the FDEM, contact detection is checked between quadratic contact elements whose centroids are within neighboring grid cells and contact interaction is calculated between element pairs found during contact detection

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Figure 2

A finite element body with triangular finite elements and quadrilateral contact elements on its upper border

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Figure 3

The interaction of two discrete quadrilateral contact elements

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Figure 4

The decomposition of an overlap polygon into triangles for calculating area

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Figure 5

A flowchart of the FDEM wear model

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Figure 6

Schematic of the combined finite-discrete element model contact geometry for a Hertzian contact

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Figure 7

Comparison of normal pressure between continuum mechanics and the FDEM

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Figure 8

Comparison of subsurface stress between the combined finite-discrete element model and continuum mechanics

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Figure 9

Variation in normal loading and tangential displacement during a fretting cycle

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Figure 10

Normalized frictional shear stress in a partial slip fretting contact at (a) Q=Qmax, (b) Q=0, and (c) Q=−Qmax

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Figure 11

Evolution of a Hertzian contact under gross partial slip and gross slip conditions at differing test lengths

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Figure 12

The effect of cycle increment on the (a) pressure profile and (b) worn profile of a Hertzian fretting contact. (pH=1.0 GPa, μ=0.6, δ=10 μm, N=12k cycles).

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Figure 13

Pressure instability resulting from a small surface element in the finite element mesh (pH=1.0 GPa, μ=0.6, δ=10 μm, ΔN=100)

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Figure 14

The influence of mesh size and cycle increment on computational stability of the FDEM

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Figure 15

Evolution of the partial slip fretting contact modeled by Nowell (6) and Ding (14)

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Figure 16

The final pressure solution for the final pressure of a Hertzian fretting contact with Hills (5)

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Figure 17

The effect of (a) Hertzian pressure (μ=0.6, δ=2 μm), (b) amplitude (pH=1.0 GPa, μ=0.6), and (c) coefficient of friction (pH=1.0 GPa, δ=2 μm) on fretting wear normalized to a baseline condition (pH=1.0 GPa, δ=2 μm, μ=0.6)

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Figure 18

Wear loss experienced by selected coatings normalized with respect to a baseline condition (δ=2.0, Ecoating=Esubstrate, N=100,000)

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Figure 19

The effect of coating thickness and modulus of elasticity on fretting wear rate in the partial slip regime normalized with respect to a baseline condition (δ=2.0, Ecoating=Esubstrate)

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Figure 20

The effect of coating thickness and modulus of elasticity on fretting wear rate in the gross slip regime normalized with respect to a baseline condition (δ=2 μm, Ecoating=Esubstrate)

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Figure 21

The effect of coating modulus of elasticity on the friction trace in the partial slip in the gross slip regime (δ=4 μm, μ=0.6)

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Figure 22

The effect of coating thickness and modulus of elasticity on fretting wear rate in the partial slip regime normalized with respect to a baseline condition (δ=2 μm, μ=0.6, Ecoating=Esubstrate)

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Figure 23

The effect of coating thickness and modulus of elasticity on fretting wear rate in the gross slip regime normalized with respect to a baseline condition (δ=2 μm, μ=0.6, Ecoating=Esubstrate)

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