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Research Papers: Applications

A New Approach for Rolling Contact Fatigue Numerical Study. Application to a Brittle Epoxy Resin

[+] Author and Article Information
Arthur Francisco

Houssein Abbouchi, Bernard Villechaise

Institut Prime, Département Génie Mécanique et Systèmes Complexes,  Université de Poitiers, IUT Angoulême, UPR CNRS 3346, 4, Avenue de Varsovie, 16021 Angoulême Cedex, France

High precision instrument to measure straightness, cylindricity and roundness.

J. Tribol 133(3), 031101 (Jul 07, 2011) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003998 History: Received September 10, 2010; Revised April 08, 2011; Published July 07, 2011; Online July 07, 2011

The background of the present study is the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in a brittle polymer disk. The disk has been tested on a two disk machine, under controlled normal and tangential loads, with no global slip. After several million cycles and under different operating conditions, it has been observed that (1) the tangential load highly influences the RCF phenomenon, (2) a network of regularly spaced cracks appears, and (3) in the driving position, the RCF phenomenon develops faster. To explain these observations, a numerical model based on the finite element method (FEM) has been built: the cracks have been quite simply modeled, stick-slip has been chosen as the friction model, and the disk-on-disk contact has been replaced by a disk-on-plane contact. To study the influence of some of the operating conditions, the design of experiments (DOE) techniques has been used. The statistical postprocessing associated to DOE has confirmed the experimental observations with a good reliability. In addition, with some mechanical considerations, scenarios of what experimentally happens are proposed. The association FEM/DOE is an original and efficient way to explain phenomena in the field of RCF: the accuracy of the FEM coupled with DOE statistical treatments make it possible to have a good predictability despite some uncontrolled parameters.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 3

Disk geometrical properties

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Figure 4

Cracks seen beneath the track, driving case

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Figure 5

Driven (a) and driving (b) cases

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Figure 6

Cylinder on plane model

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Perturbation due to the chamfer

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Figure 10

Interdistance decomposition

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Sxx determination

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Process overview

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Stress distribution in the driving case

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Figure 15

Stress distribution in the driven case

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Carter’s theory (th) and numerical results (num)

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Figure 21

Effects on “Sxx,” driving case

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Figure 22

Effects on “Sxx,” driven case

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Figure 23

Effects on “Sxxmea ,” driving case

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Figure 24

Effects on “Sxxmea, ” driven case

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Figure 25

Effects on “Sxxamp, ” driving case

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Figure 26

Effects on “Sxxamp, ” driven case

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Figure 27

Effect of “i” on “d

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Figure 28

Effect of “i” on “Sxx

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Figure 29

Effect of “T” on “Sxx

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Figure 30

Effect of “i” on “Sxxmea ”

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Figure 31

Effect of “i” on “Sxxamp ”

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Figure 32

Effect of “T” on “Sxxamp ”

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Figure 33

Crack apparition scenario

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Figure 34

Difference of the tensile stress levels due to “T” orientation

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Figure 35

Influence of “l” on “d

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Figure 1

Carter’s theory

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Figure 17

Influence of cracks

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Figure 18

Radj2 and results

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Figure 19

Effects on “d,” driving case

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Figure 20

Effects on “d,” driven case

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