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Research Papers: Other (Seals, Manufacturing)

Tribological Testing of Steel Coupons Bonded to Cu-Based Microchannel Heat Exchangers

[+] Author and Article Information
Fanghua Mei, W. J. Meng

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

Carl H. Hager, Liang A. Xue, Ryan D. Evans, Gary L. Doll

 Timken Technology Center, The Timken Company, Canton, OH 44706

J. Tribol 133(3), 032201 (Jul 21, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003858 History: Received October 11, 2010; Revised March 07, 2011; Published July 21, 2011; Online July 21, 2011

Metal-based microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) may offer a solution to thermal management required in a unlubricated bearing with ceramic or coated rolling elements. In this paper, we report results of tribological testing on steel coupons cooled by Cu-based MHEs. Low-profile Cu-based MHEs were fabricated and bonded to steel coupons, whose front faces were made to contact a crowned rotating steel ring, with and without oil lubrication. A series of tribological tests were conducted under different conditions with and without cooling. The tests collectively show that low-profile Cu-based MHEs placed in proximity of a tribological contact can be effective in removing heat generated at the contact interface, decrease the contact interfacial friction, and mitigate the amount of interfacial wear in sliding contacts, with and without oil lubrication. The present results suggest that cooling of tribological contact zones by embedding MHEs in proximity can be beneficial to tribological performance and deserves further investigations for tribological contact applications.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 8

Surface morphologies of the contact patch on the coated steel coupon after (a) test 4 and (b) test 5

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Figure 7

The history of temperatures and the friction coefficient measured during tests 4 and 5 with and without water flow through the Cu MHE bonded to the steel coupon; (a) ring temperature and friction coefficient of tests 4 and 5 as a function of time; (b) corresponding temperature of the steel coupon as a function of time

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Figure 6

Values of the ring temperature and the friction coefficient as a function of time during test 3

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Figure 5

Surface morphologies of the contact patch on the steel coupon after (a) test 1 and (b) test 2

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Figure 4

The history of temperatures and friction coefficients measured during tests 1 and 2 under flowing oil lubrication, with and without water flow through the Cu MHE bonded to the steel coupon; (a) ring temperature and friction coefficient of tests 1 and 2 as a function of time; (b) corresponding temperatures of the steel coupon as well as the MHE water inlet and outlet thermocouples as a function of time

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Figure 3

Experimental setup for tribological testing in the rotating crowned ring on stationary block configuration; (a) an overview of the testing apparatus; (b) back view of the stationary holder for the bonded steel-coupon/Cu-MHE assembly; (c) a schematic of the thermocouple fixture; (d) a schematic cross-sectional view of the test section, together with thermocouple locations (shown as black dots with indication arrows marked A, B, C, D)

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Figure 2

An overview of the bonded steel-coupon/Cu-MHE assembly, with plastic fluidic adaptors connected to the fluid supply and drain holes

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Figure 1

Fabrication of Cu-based MHEs; (a) an overview of a typical as-machined Cu coupon after μEDM, with the fluid supply and drain plena (left); a blank Cu sheet (middle); and a round 52,100 steel coupon (right). Numbers shown on the ruler are in mm; (b) a detailed view of one fluidic plenum on the Cu coupon, showing the transitions from the plenum to the microchannel array.

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