0
Research Papers: Contact Mechanics

Fractal Analysis of Cavitation Eroded Surface in Dilute Emulsions

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Abouel-Kasem1

Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Eng.-Rabigh,  King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 344, Rabigh 21911, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egypt e-mail: abouelkasem@yahoo.comElectrical Engineering Department, King Saud University,  Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia e-mail: falturki@ksu.edu.saMechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering,  Majmaah University, North Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia e-mail: shemy2007@yahoo.com

F. A. Alturki, S. M. Ahmed

Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Eng.-Rabigh,  King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 344, Rabigh 21911, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egypt e-mail: abouelkasem@yahoo.comElectrical Engineering Department, King Saud University,  Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia e-mail: falturki@ksu.edu.saMechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering,  Majmaah University, North Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia e-mail: shemy2007@yahoo.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 133(4), 041403 (Oct 10, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004927 History: Received February 27, 2011; Revised August 15, 2011; Published October 10, 2011; Online October 10, 2011

In the present work, the topographical images of cavitation erosion surfaces at water and oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions were quantified using fractal analysis. The oil-in-water emulsion concentrations were 2, 5 and 10 wt. %, which are in the popular range used in hydraulic systems. The study showed that the variation of fractal dimension calculated from slope of linearized power spectral density for water and o/w emulsions can be used to characterize the cavitation intensity in similar manner to the weight loss. Both the fractal dimension and the weight loss decrease with adding oil to water. It was also found that the variation of fractal dimension versus concentration of oil-in-water emulsions has a general trend that does not depend on magnification factor. The cavitation erosion behavior and mechanism for water and o/w emulsions has been studied. It was found that the predominant failure mode was fatigue for water and o/w emulsions.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Power spectral density of a fractal isotropic surface

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Schematic view of test apparatus

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

The viscosity, surface tension and pH as a function of oil-in-water concentrations

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Cumulative weight loss of o/w emulsions and water versus time

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Cumulative weight versus o/w emulsions and water at t = 7 h

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Cumulative weight loss versus viscosity of medium at t = 7 h

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Eroded surface pattern for SUS 304 stainless steel cavitating in water and o/w emulsions at 7h

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

SEM photographs of eroded surfaces for water and o/w emulsions at t = 10 min

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Showing the material removal

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

(a) Images of surface of steel stain cavitating in water and o/w emulsions (i) water, (ii) 2%, (iii) 5%, and (iv) 10% o/w emulsions. (b) The power spectrum of the images, plotted as directionally averaged of log (PSD) versus log (frequency), the upper right part of which shows its phase distribution (estimated at images originally magnified 3500).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Variation of fractal dimension with in water and o/w emulsions for stainless steel at time 10 min and different magnifications

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In