0
Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Coupling Continuous and Discontinuous Descriptions to Model First Body Deformation in Third Body Flows

[+] Author and Article Information
Hong-Phong Cao

Laboratory of Mechanics of Contacts and Structures,  University of Lyon, CNRS, F-69621 Villeurbanne Francehong-phong.cao@insa-lyon.fr

Mathieu Renouf

Laboratory of Mechanics of Contacts and Structures,  University of Lyon, CNRS, F-69621 Villeurbanne FranceMathieu.Renouf@insa-lyon.fr

Frédéric Dubois

Laboratory of Mechanics of Contacts and Civil Engineering,  University of Montpellier II, CNRS, F-34096 Montpellier France e-mail:frederic.dubois@univ-montp2.fr

Yves Berthier

Laboratory of Mechanics of Contacts and Structures,  University of Lyon, CNRS, F-69621 Villeurbanne France e-mail:Yves.Berthier@insa-lyon.fr

J. Tribol 133(4), 041601 (Oct 04, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004881 History: Received October 25, 2010; Revised July 25, 2011; Published October 04, 2011; Online October 04, 2011

The present paper proposes an extension of the classical discrete element method used to study third body flows. Based on the concept of the tribological triplet proposed by Godet and Berthier, the aim of this work is to enrich description, by accounting for the deformation of the first body and investigating its influence on third-body rheology. To achieve this, a novel hybrid approach that combines continuous and discontinuous descriptions is used. To illustrate the advantage of such modeling, comparisons with the classical approach, which considers the first body as rigid, are performed in terms of macroscopic friction coefficient and velocity and stress profiles.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Representation of the linear mappings between the contact frame (local level) and body frame (global level) for (a) a rigid/deformable contact and (b) a rigid/rigid contact. The red dots represent contact points connected to the local frame while the green dots represent mesh nodes and the center of the mass of particles connected to contact points via the linear mapping H.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Plastic law (a), elastic law (b): g represents the interstice between two bodies, rN is the normal reaction of the particle at contact point, γ is the cohesive force between two particles in the contact, dw the distance of influence of the cohesion

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Geometry of the numerical models used with: (a) a rigid upper body (rigid model), (b) a deformable upper body (deformable model). Visualization of the velocity field within the third body, ranging from 0 (blue color) to 5 m/s (red color), the shear velocity value.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Hybrid element as a function of the smaller diameter of a third body particle, d, and the size of a cell, l: (a) d > l, (b) d = l, and (c) d < l

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

The power for each bodies in the tribological contact

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Evolution of the global friction coefficient (μ) as a function of the cohesive force γ for different upper body behaviors and interaction laws

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Evolution of the ratio between ɛELAS and ɛIQS for both rigid and deformable UB models as a function of the cohesion value

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Percent of energy loss during a shock as a function of the ratio between the theoretical time step and the simulation time step

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Profile of σyy for the IQS law through the third body thickness as a function of upper body rigidity and the local cohesive force γ: (a) γ = 0, (b) γ = 0.5, and (c) γ = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Profile of σxy for the IQS law through the third body thickness as a function of the upper body rigidity and the local cohesive force γ: (a) γ = 0, (b) γ = 0.5, and (c) γ = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Visualization of the final snapshot of the simulation for different cohesive forces: σyy component for the deformable structure and deformation pattern of the third-body

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Velocity profile through the third body thickness as a function of the upper body rigidity and the local cohesive force γ

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In