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Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Improved Wear Resistance of Dendrite Composite Eutectic Fe-B Alloy

[+] Author and Article Information
Licai Fu1

State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication,  Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, PR China;Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G2V4, Canada e-mail: licai1@ualberta.caState Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, PR China

Jun Yang, Qinling Bi, Weimin Liu

State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication,  Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, PR China;Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G2V4, Canada e-mail: licai1@ualberta.caState Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, PR China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 133(4), 041602 (Oct 10, 2011) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005067 History: Received November 02, 2010; Revised September 06, 2011; Published October 10, 2011; Online October 10, 2011

The dry-sliding tribological properties of the dendrite composite eutectic Fe-B alloys (Fe94.3 B5.7 , Fe75 B25 Fe67 B33 ) were studied comparatively with various sliding speeds. The friction coefficient of the Fe-B alloy changes slightly with the boron content. The wear rate of the Fe94.3 B5.7 alloy with about 30 vol. % dendrite t-Fe2 B is only one third of Fe75 B25 alloy with 15 vol. % dendrite and Fe67 B33 alloy with 90 vol. % dendrite in the high sliding speed. First, a hard t-Fe2 B phase reduced the wear of the Fe-B alloy directly. Second, the compactly oxide layers resulting from oxidation of the α-Fe on the worn surfaces also decreases the wear rate of Fe-B alloys. On the whole, the wear rate of the Fe94.3 B5.7 is lower than Fe67 B33 and Fe75 B25 .

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 9

EDS patterns of worn surface of (a) Fe94.3 B5.7 , (b) Fe75 B25 , and (c) Fe67 B33 after sliding for 20 min under 30 N with 0.04 m/s

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Figure 10

XPS spectra of Fe2p, Si2p of the Fe-B alloys on the worn surfaces with 0.08 m/s

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Figure 8

SEM images of the worn surfaces of the Fe94.3 B5.7 alloy after sliding 20 min with (a) 0.02 m/s and (b) 0.08 m/s

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Figure 7

SEM images of the worn surfaces of the Fe75 B25 alloy after sliding 20 min with (a) 0.02 m/s and (b) 0.10 m/s

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Figure 6

SEM images of the worn surfaces of the Fe67 B33 alloy after sliding 20 min with (a) 0.02 m/s and (b) 0.10 m/s

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Figure 5

SEM images of worn surface of (a) Fe94.3 B5.7 and (b) Fe67 B33 with speed of 0.06 m/s

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Figure 4

Variations of friction coefficients of the Fe-B alloy with sliding speed

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Figure 3

Evolution of friction coefficient for the Fe75 B25 alloy with sliding time with 30 N and 0.08 m/s

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Figure 2

Variations of wear rates of the Fe-B alloy with sliding speed

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Figure 1

SEM images of the Fe-B alloys: (a) Fe67 B33 , (b) Fe75 B25 , and (c) Fe94.3 B5.7

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