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Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Tribological Characteristics of Deformed Magnesium Alloy AZ61 Under Dry Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Abdel-Wahab El-Morsy

Mechanical Eng. Dept., Faculty of Eng.-Rabigh, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 344 Rabigh 21911, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Mechanical Eng. Dept., Faculty of Eng., Helwan University, Helwan, Egyptelmorsya@yahoo.com

A. Abouel-Kasem1

Mechanical Eng. Dept., Faculty of Eng.-Rabigh, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 344 Rabigh 21911, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egyptabouelkasem@yahoo.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 133(4), 041603 (Oct 19, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004761 History: Received March 10, 2011; Accepted July 18, 2011; Published October 19, 2011; Online October 19, 2011

The wear behavior of deformed magnesium alloy AZ61 under dry conditions was evaluated. Two types of AZ61 alloy were used, extruded and rolled samples, to investigate the effect of deformation process on the wear behavior. The experiments were performed using a pin-on-ring type wear apparatus against a stainless-steel counterface under applied stresses in the range of 3–7 MPa, and within a sliding velocity range of 0.2–1.8 m/s. The topographical images of the eroded surfaces at different sliding velocity for extruded and rolled samples were quantified using fractal analysis. The results revealed that for all applied stress, the wear rates increased with increasing the sliding velocity of both samples. The wear rate of the rolled samples is greater than that of the extruded samples at the stress range from 3 to 5 MPa. However, when the stress is increased to 7 MPa the wear rate of the rolled samples is lower than that of the extruded samples. The variation of fractal value of slope of linearized power spectral density (PSD) with the sliding velocity is largely similar to the relationship between the wear rate and the sliding velocity.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Photo and schematic illustration of Tribometer testing machine

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Figure 2

Optical micrograph of AZ61 alloy (a) extruded sample and (b) rolled sample

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Figure 3

Effect of sliding velocity on the wear rate at different stresses: (a) 3, (b) 5, and (c) 7 MPa

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Figure 4

Predicted contact temperatures using equation of Chen and Alpas [4]

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Figure 5

Large, irregular lumps in the wear debris broken off from layers

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Figure 6

Wear rate contour map of AZ61 (a) extruded samples and (b) rolled samples

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Figure 7

Comparison of calculated and experimentally measured wear rate in severe wear region

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Figure 8

(a) Images of extruded worn surface at 7 MPa stress and sliding velocity (i) 0.2, (ii) 0.8 (iii), and 1.8 m/s. (b) The power spectrum plotted as directionally averaged of log (PSD) versus log (frequency) (estimated at images originally magnified 200).

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Figure 9

(a) Images of rolled worn surface at 7 MPa stress and sliding velocity (i) 0.2, (ii) 0.8, (iii), and 1.8 m/s. (b) The power spectrum plotted as directionally averaged of log (PSD) versus log (frequency) (estimated at images originally magnified 200).

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Figure 10

Variation of fractal value with sliding velocity at 7 MPa applied stress

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