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Research Papers: Other (Seals, Manufacturing)

Identification of a Friction Model at the Tool-Chip-Workpiece Interface in Dry Machining of a AISI 1045 Steel With a TiN Coated Carbide Tool

[+] Author and Article Information
Hamdi Ben Abdelali1

Laboratoire de Génie Mécanique,  Université de Monastir, Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Monastir, Avenue Ibn Al-Jazzar, 5019 Monastir, Tunisie e-mail: hamdi.benabdelali@yahoo.fr

Cedric Courbon

 Université de Lyon, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, LTDS, UMR CNRS 5513, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully, France e-mail: cedric.courbon@ec-lyon.fr

Joël Rech

 Université de Lyon, ENISE, LTDS, UMR CNRS 5513, 58 Rue Jean Parot, 42023 Saint-Etienne, France e-mail: joel.rech@enise.fr

Wacef Ben Salem

Abdelwaheb Dogui

Laboratoire de Génie Mécanique,  Université de Monastir, Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Monastir, Avenue Ibn Al-Jazzar, 5019 Monastir, Tunisieabdel.dogui@enim.rnu.tn

Philippe Kapsa

LTDS, UMR CNRS 5513,  Université de Lyon, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully, France e-mail: philippe.kapsa@ec-lyon.fr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 133(4), 042201 (Oct 06, 2011) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004879 History: Received December 25, 2010; Revised August 01, 2011; Published October 06, 2011; Online October 06, 2011

The characterization of frictional phenomena at the tool-chip-workpiece interface in metal cutting remains a challenge. This paper aims at identifying a friction model and a heat partition model at this interface during the dry cutting of an AISI1045 steel with TiN coated carbide tools. A new tribometer, based on a modified pin-on-ring system, has been used in order to reach relevant values of pressures, temperatures, and sliding velocities. Additionally a 3D Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian model (A.L.E.) numerical model simulating the frictional test has been developed in order to extract local parameters around the spherical pin, such as average contact pressure, average local sliding velocity, and average contact temperature, from experimental macroscopic measurements. A large range of sliding velocities [0.083–5 m/s] has been investigated. It has been shown that friction coefficient and heat partition coefficient are mainly dependant on local sliding velocity at the interface. Three friction regimes have been identified. These experimental and numerical results provide a better understanding of the tribological phenomena along the tool-chip-workpiece interfaces in dry machining of an AISI 1045 steel with a TiN coated carbide tool. Finally a new friction model and heat partition model has been developed for implementation in a numerical cutting model.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Chip formation mechanisms (a), Typical shape of normal stress distribution (b) and sliding velocity distribution on the tool rake face (c) [1]

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Figure 2

Principle and design of the tribometer

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Figure 3

Description of the heat flux measurement technique: Calibration step and Application step [13]

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Figure 4

Evolution of apparent friction coefficient versus sliding velocity

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Figure 5

Evolution of heat flux transmitted to pins versus sliding velocity

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Figure 6

Evolution of heat partition ratio versus sliding velocity

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Figure 7

Description of the numerical model

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Figure 8

Determination of adhesive friction coefficient under a sliding velocity of 5 m/s

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Figure 9

Evolution of adhesive and apparent friction coefficient versus sliding velocity (a), Evolution of numerical and experiment heat flux transmitted to the pin versus sliding velocity (b)

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Figure 10

An example of local parameters results for sliding velocity of 5 m/s

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Figure 11

Evolution of average contact pressure versus sliding velocity

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Figure 12

Evolution of average contact temperature versus sliding velocity

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Figure 13

Evolution of average local sliding velocity versus sliding velocity

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Figure 14

Evolution of adhesive friction coefficient versus average local sliding velocity

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Figure 15

Evolution of heat flux partition ratio versus average local sliding velocity

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