0
Friction & Wear

Transition of Wear Mechanisms of Plasma Source Nitrided AISI 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel Against Ceramic Counterface

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Y. Li, Z. Y. Wang

Surface Engineering Laboratory,  School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China

M. K. Lei1

Surface Engineering Laboratory,  School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, Chinasurfeng@dlut.edu.cn

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 134(1), 011601 (Feb 24, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005516 History: Received June 25, 2011; Revised November 16, 2011; Published February 10, 2012; Online February 24, 2012

A single high-nitrogen face-centered-cubic (f.c.c.) phase (γN ) layer formed on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel at a nitriding temperature of 450 °C for a nitriding time of 6 h. An approximately 17 μm-thick γN layer has a peak nitrogen concentration of about 20 at. %. Tribological properties of the γN phase layer on a ball-on-disk tribometer against an Si3 N4 ceramic counterface under a normal load of 2 and 6 N with a sliding speed of 0.15 to 0.29 m/s were investigated by friction coefficient and specific wear rate measurement. Worn surface morphology and wear debris were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The microhardness of the γN phase layer on the nitrided stainless steel was measured as about 15.1 GPa. The change in the friction coefficient of the γN phase layer on the stainless steel was dependent on the applied normal load, which was associated with that in the specific wear rate. Under a lower normal load of 2 N, the lower specific wear rate of the γN phase layer with a sliding speed of 0.15 m/s was obtained as 2.8 × 10−6 mm3 /N m with a friction coefficient of 0.60. Under a higher normal load of 6 N, the lower specific wear rate with a sliding speed of 0.29 m/s was 7.9 × 10−6 mm3 /N m with a friction coefficient of 0.80. When the applied load increased from 2 to 6 N, a transition of the wear mechanisms from oxidative to abrasive wear was found, which was derived from the oxidation reaction and the h.c.p. martensite phase transformation of the γN phase during the wear tests, respectively.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic diagram of plasma source nitriding equipment

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Optical micrograph of the nitrided layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel at a nitriding temperature of 450 °C for a nitriding time of 6 h

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Concentration-depth profile of the nitrided layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel at a nitriding temperature of 450 °C for a nitriding time of 6 h measured by EPMA

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

XRD pattern of the nitrided layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel at a nitriding temperature of 450 °C for a nitriding time of 6 h

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Microhardness-depth profile of the γN phase layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 stainless steel at a nitriding temperature of 450 °C for a nitriding time of 6 h

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Friction coefficient curves relative to the sliding distance on a ball-on-disk tribometer against an Si3 N4 ceramic counterface under a normal load of 2 and 6 N with a sliding speed from 0.15 to 0.29 m/s for the γN phase layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 stainless steel, respectively

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Cross-sectional profilometer patterns of wear tracks on a ball-on-disk tribometer against an Si3 N4 ceramic counterface under a normal load of 2 and 6 N with a sliding speed from 0.15 to 0.29 m/s for the γN phase layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 stainless steel, respectively

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Specific wear rate of the γN phase layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 stainless steel on a ball-on-disk tribometer against an Si3 N4 ceramic counterface under a normal load of 2 and 6 N with a sliding speed from 0.15 to 0.29 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

SEM observation of the worn surfaces for the γN phase layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 stainless steel on a ball-on-disk tribometer against an Si3 N4 ceramic counterface under a normal load of 2 N with a sliding speed from 0.15 to 0.29 m/s: (a) 0.15 m/s, (b) 0.22 m/s, and (c) 0.29 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

SEM observation of the worn surfaces for the γN phase layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 stainless steel on a ball-on-disk tribometer against an Si3 N4 ceramic counterface under a normal load of 6 N with a sliding speed from 0.15 to 0.29 m/s: (a) 0.15 m/s, (b) 0.22 m/s, and (c) 0.29 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

SEM observation of the worn surfaces of the Si3 N4 ceramic ball counterface for the γN phase on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 stainless steel on a ball-on-disk tribometer with a sliding speed of 0.22 m/s under a normal load of 2 and 6 N: (a) 2 N load; (b) 6 N load

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

TEM image and selected area diffraction pattern from the wear debris for the γN phase layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 stainless steel on a ball-on-disk tribometer against an Si3 N4 ceramic counterface under a normal load of 2 N with a sliding speed of 0.22 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

TEM image and selected area diffraction pattern from the wear debris for the γN phase layer on the plasma source nitrided AISI 316 stainless steel on a ball-on-disk tribometer against an Si3 N4 ceramic counterface under a normal load of 6 N with a sliding speed of 0.22 m/s

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In