0
Contact Mechanics

Influence of Contact Geometry on Local Friction Energy and Stiffness of Revolute Joints

[+] Author and Article Information
Alexander Gummer

 University of Kaiserslautern, Institute of Machine Elements, Gears, and Transmissions, Gottlieb-Daimler-Strasse 67663 Kaiserslautern, Germanygummer@mv.uni-kl.de

Bernd Sauer

 University of Kaiserslautern, Institute of Machine Elements, Gears, and Transmissions, Gottlieb-Daimler-Strasse 67663 Kaiserslautern, Germanysauer@mv.uni-kl.de

J. Tribol 134(2), 021402 (Apr 12, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006248 History: Received August 04, 2011; Revised February 21, 2012; Published April 10, 2012; Online April 12, 2012

Revolute joints (also called pin joints or hinge joints) are used in many different mechanical systems such as robotic arms, door hinges, folding mechanisms, or hydraulic shovels. Since they transmit forces and give a rotational degree of freedom to the connected parts, revolute joints have a major impact on the dynamic behavior of the system into which they are built. Two main characteristics of these elements are their stiffness and their clearance. Both of them change as the wear between the joint’s pin and the rod hole increases during operation. In order to consider these aspects in a multibody simulation an analytical, numerically effective method has been developed to calculate the stiffness of a revolute joint in dependence of the geometry and the wear state. In addition, the calculation algorithm allows for for the analysis of the local friction energy that occurs in the contact zone. In this paper, the calculation approach is presented together with the results for two different steady loaded revolute joints.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Layout, dimensions, and operating conditions of the investigated joints

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Algorithm for calculating wear, stiffness, and friction energy of revolute joints

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Discretization of the pin and rod hole

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Single side and double side contact between the pin and rod hole

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Comparison of contact force models for investigated joints, when the pin is stiff

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Influence of the penetration on the semi-contact angle for different values of clearance

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Simple approach to calculate the stiffness of the rod and the yoke

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Calculation of the wear volume, assuming that the complete wear is on the bush

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Influence of the joint clearance on the load depending on stiffness (joint A)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Wear depths of joints A and B at different time steps (Remarks: the slices of joint B are wider than the slices of joint A; slice #24 is in the middle of the pin; wear coefficients: C = 1 × 10−20 and m = 1.1; operating conditions are as presented in Fig. 1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Local friction energy at slices for different wear states and a time period of 1 s (Remarks: the slices of joint B are wider than the slices of joint A; slice #24 is in the middle of the pin; wear coefficients: C = 1 × 10−20 and m = 1.1; operating conditions are as presented in Fig. 1; μ = 0.1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Load depending on the stiffness of revolute joints for different wear states (wear coefficients: C = 1 × 10−20 and m = 1.1; operating conditions as presented in Fig. 1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Different contact conditions depending on the load of the joint

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Force at different slices for different loads on the worn profile after 1000 h (wear coefficients: C = 1 × 10−20 and m = 1.1; operating conditions are as presented in Fig. 1)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In