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Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

Mixed Lubricated Line Contact Analysis for Spur Gears using a Deterministic Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Huaiju Liu1

School of Engineering,  University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK

Ken Mao

School of Engineering,  University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK

Caichao Zhu, Xiangyang Xu

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Transmission,  Chongqing University, 174 Shazhengje, Shapingba, Chongqing, 400044, P. R. C.

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 134(2), 021501 (Apr 12, 2012) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005771 History: Received September 05, 2011; Revised December 07, 2011; Published April 10, 2012; Online April 12, 2012

The unified approach based upon the Reduced Reynolds technique is applied to develop a deterministic transient mixed lubrication line contact model. This model is used in spur gear applications to comprehensively show effects of roughness, working conditions, i.e., rotational speeds and loads on pressure ripples and severity of asperity contacts. Results show effects of the speed, the load, as well as the RMS value are coupled which makes it difficult to evaluate lubrication states by only considering one variable. Considering the Ree-Eyring non-Newtonian behavior could alleviate pressure ripples significantly, compared with the Newtonian fluid assumption. Small RMS values of surfaces, which could be achieved by superfinish techniques, would be desirable when evaluating gear tooth surface contact performances.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Variations of radius, tangential speed, load and maximum Hertzian pressure for case 8

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Figure 2

Lambda ratio (the dash line, the thin line and the thick line represent cases with RMS values 0.2μm, 0.4μm and 0.8μm, respectively)

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Figure 3

Effects of speed on smooth-surface minimum film thickness

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Figure 4

Effects of load on smooth-surface minimum film thickness

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Figure 5

Effects of speed with σ=0.8μm surfaces

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Figure 6

Effects of load with σ=0.8μm surfaces

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Figure 7

Asperity-contact ratios of case 8 with different rough surfaces

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Figure 8

Effect of the RMS value on asperity-contact load ratio for case 8

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Figure 9

Maximum pressure of case 8 with different rough surfaces

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Figure 10

Comparison of the Ree-Eyring fluid, Newtonian fluid and dry contact with σ=0.4μm

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Figure 11

Comparison of the Ree-Eyring fluid, Newtonian fluid and dry contact with σ=0.05μm

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