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Hydrodynamic Lubrication

Thermohydrodynamic Analysis of Spiral Groove Mechanical Face Seal for Liquid Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Yifan Qiu

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, 2508 Patrick Taylor Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

M. M. Khonsari1

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, 2508 Patrick Taylor Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803Khonsari@me.lsu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 134(2), 021703 (Apr 12, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006063 History: Received July 20, 2011; Revised February 03, 2012; Published April 10, 2012; Online April 12, 2012

In this study, a three-dimensional thermohydrodynamic (THD) CFD model is developed to study the characteristics of an inward pumping spiral groove mechanical seal pair using a commercial CFD software CFD-ACE + . The model is capable of predicting the temperature distribution and pressure distribution of the seal pair. Based on the CFD model, a parametric study is conducted to evaluate the performance of the seal. It is found that thermal behavior plays an important role in the overall performance of a seal. The spiral groove parameter can be optimized to achieve desired performance. The optimization is dependent on the application requirement of the seal.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Basic geometric shape of spiral groove

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Figure 2

Spiral groove seal components (a) and stationary ring groove configurations (b): (i) and (ii) inward pumping, (iii) and (iv) outward pumping

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Figure 3

Groove, land, and dam on a spiral groove ring

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Figure 4

Computational domains of the spiral groove model

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Figure 6

Pressure distribution of the validation case

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Figure 7

Temperature distribution of (x, y) plane at Z = B/2

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Figure 8

Pressure distribution comparison between current model and narrow groove theory result

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Figure 9

Flow in the groove

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Figure 10

Pressure distribution on the top surface of a groove

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Figure 11

Temperature contours of the groove from different cross sections

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Figure 12

Film thickness and leakage rate relationship

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Figure 13

Load-carrying capacity and film thickness relationship

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Figure 14

Maximum temperature and film thickness relationship

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Figure 15

Influence of groove depth to leakage rate

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Figure 16

Influence of groove depth on maximum temperature

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Figure 17

Influence of groove depth to the load-carrying capacity

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Figure 18

Influence of groove-to-dam ratio to the leakage rate

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Figure 19

Influence of groove-to-dam ratio to the maximum temperature

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Figure 20

Influence of groove-to-dam ratio to the load-carrying capacity

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Figure 21

Influence of groove-to-land ratio to the leakage rate

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Figure 22

Influence of groove-to-land ratio to the maximum temperature

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Figure 23

Influence of groove-to-land ratio to the load-carrying capacity

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Figure 24

The effects of spiral angle to the maximum temperature and the load-carrying capacity

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Figure 25

The effects of spiral angle to the leakage rate

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