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Micro-Nano Tribology

Influence of Shearing Surface Topography on Frictional Properties of ZnS Nanowire-Based Lubrication System across Ductile Surfaces

[+] Author and Article Information
Bassem A. Kheireddin, Vinay Narayanunni

Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program,  Texas A&M University, 230 Jack E. Brown Engineering Building, 3122 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3122

Mustafa Akbulut1

Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program,  Texas A&M University, 230 Jack E. Brown Engineering Building, 3122 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3122

1

Corresponding author. e-mail address: mustafa.akbulut@chemail.tamu.edu

J. Tribol 134(2), 022001 (Apr 12, 2012) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005891 History: Received August 31, 2011; Revised January 19, 2012; Published April 10, 2012; Online April 12, 2012

This work deals with the effect of surface roughness parameters on the frictional properties of nanowire-based lubrication systems (NBLS) across Cu surfaces with various topographies. The friction coefficient was discussed in the context of surface roughness parameters including the rms height, inter-island separation and a combined roughness parameter related to the pressure experienced by each nanowire. It was concluded that the rms height of asperity should not be lower than the radius of nanoparticles for effective lubrication. In addition, when the inter-island separation is an integer multiple of the nanowire length, nanowires perform as effective lubricants. Furthermore, the friction coefficient increased when the mean pressure experienced by the nanowires increased. The results obtained in this original study offer some interesting insights into the frictional properties of NBLS as a function of surface roughness parameters. This could lead to a great impact on the selection of nanoparticle-based lubricant aimed at reducing wear and energy losses for various applications.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 5

The lateral force required to overcome the barrier normalized by the normal load (F//  =  F/L) versus the angle of inclination θ. Curved lines correspond to the case where the object is at an angle of inclination θ, whereas horizontal lines correspond to the case where the object lies parallel to the surface (h values were selected based upon rms values).

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Figure 6

(a) Illustration of a model system involving nanoparticles confined between a smooth plane and a nominally flat surface. (b) The coefficient of friction versus ξ, which is an indication of the mean pressure experienced by each nanowire located on top of islands.

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Figure 4

(a) The coefficient of friction versus inter-island separation, b. (b) Possible effects of variation in the inter-island separation on the organization of nanowires on these surfaces are shown. (c) The forces acting on a cylindrical particle that is in contact with an obstacle of height, h.

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Figure 3

(a) The coefficient of friction versus rms height, (b) The forces acting on a cylindrical particle that is in contact with a rectangular obstacle

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Figure 2

5 μm  ×  5 μm AFM images of 100 nm thick Cu films on atomically smooth mica prepared at deposition rates of 0.1 nm/s, 0.2 nm/s, 0.4 nm/s and 0.5 nm/s

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Figure 1

TEM micrograph of the prepared octadecylamine-coated ZnS nanowires. The mean nanowire length was 109  ±  18 nm, the core diameter was 1.2  ±  0.2 nm, and the total diameter was 3.8  ±  0.4 nm. Nanowires were deposited from dodecane onto a perforated carbon-coated TEM grid.

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