0
Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

A Model for Line-Contact EHL Problems—Consideration of Effects of Navier-Slip and Lubricant Rheology

[+] Author and Article Information
Li-Ming Chu

Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering,  I-Shou University, No. 1, Sec. 1, Syuecheng Road, Dashu District, Kaohsiung City 84001, Taiwan, R.O.C.hmchu@isu.edu.tw

Jaw-Ren Lin

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Taoyuan Innovation Institute of Technology, 414, Sec. 3, Chung-Shang E. Road, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 320, Taiwan, R.O.C.jrlin@nanya.edu.tw

Wang-Long Li1

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering,  National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan, 701, Taiwan, R.O.C.wlli@mail.ncku.edu.tw

Jian-Ming Lu

Associate ResearcherNational Center for High-Performance Computing,  National Applied Research Laboratories, No. 28, Nanke 3rd Road, Sinshih District, Tainan, 74147, Taiwan, R.O.C.rockylu@nchc.narl.org.tw

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 134(3), 031502 (Jun 18, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006860 History: Received January 22, 2012; Revised April 16, 2012; Published June 18, 2012; Online June 18, 2012

The coupled extended Reynolds (which includes the effects of Navier-slip and flow rheology), elasticity deformation, and the load equilibrium (under a constant load condition) equations are solved simultaneously for the EHL problems. Results show that as the slip length increases or the flow index decreases, the film thickness decreases, the central pressure increases, the pressure spike decreases, the maximum pressure switches from the pressure spike to the central pressure, and the film shape and pressure profiles moves gradually toward the outlet. A proper combination of flow rheology and slip length could fulfill some preferred EHL conditions.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Maximum and central pressure versus load for different slip conditions (line with circle for pmax and line without circle for pc)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Minimum film thickness versus slip length for different slip conditions and flow indices (long dotted line for n = 0.98, solid line for n = 1, and dotted line for n = 1.02)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Maximum pressure versus slip length for different slip conditions and flow indices (long dotted line for n = 0.98, solid line for n = 1, and dotted line for n = 1.02)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Minimum and central film thickness versus slip length for different slip conditions (solid line for Hmin and dotted line for Hc)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

The positions of the maximum pressure and minimum film thickness versus slip length for different slip conditions (solid line for Xmax and dotted line for Xmin)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Maximum and central pressure versus slip length for different slip conditions (solid line for Pmax and dotted line for Pc)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Velocity distribution across the film in the X-direction with three different lubricants

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Velocity distribution across the film in the X-direction with different slip conditions, four cases that combined the slip lengths of lower surface and upper surface (B1,B2): A(0, 0), B(0.26, 0), C(0.52, 0), and D(0.26, 0.26) (solid line for X = −1.0, and solid line with circle for X = 0.753)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Minimum and central film thickness versus load for different slip conditions (line with circle for hmin and line without circle for hc)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Minimum film thickness versus load for different slip conditions and flow indices (long dotted line for n = 0.98, solid line for n = 1, and dotted line for n = 1.02)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Pressure profiles and film shapes with three different lubricants

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Pressure profiles and film shapes with different slip conditions, four cases that combined the slip lengths of lower surface and upper surface (B1,B2): A(0, 0), B(0.26, 0), C(0.52, 0), and D(0.26, 0.26)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

(a) A schematic diagram for a pure shear flow with slip length. The slip length b can be thought as the virtual distance below the surface where the no-slip boundary condition would be satisfied.(b) A flow chart for present analysis.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In