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Hydrodynamic Lubrication

Temporal and Convective Inertia Effects in Plain Journal Bearings With Eccentricity, Velocity and Acceleration

[+] Author and Article Information
Saeid Dousti1

Rotating Machinery and Controls Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  University of Virginia, 122 Engineer’s Way, Charlottesville, VA 22904sd3tx@virginia.edu

Jianming Cao

Rotating Machinery and Controls Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  University of Virginia, 122 Engineer’s Way, Charlottesville, VA 22904 jc3wn@virginia.edu

Amir Younan

Rotating Machinery and Controls Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  University of Virginia, 122 Engineer’s Way, Charlottesville, VA 22904aay7n@virginia.edu

Paul Allaire

Rotating Machinery and Controls Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  University of Virginia, 122 Engineer’s Way, Charlottesville, VA 22904pea@virginia.edu

Tim Dimond

Rotating Machinery and Controls Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  University of Virginia, 122 Engineer’s Way, Charlottesville, VA 22904twd5c@virginia.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 134(3), 031704 (Jun 19, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006928 History: Received July 19, 2011; Revised May 17, 2012; Published June 19, 2012; Online June 19, 2012

This paper extends the theory originally developed by Tichy (Tichy and Bou-Said, 1991, Hydrodynamic Lubrication and Bearing Behavior With Impulsive Loads,” STLE Tribol. Trans. 34 , pp. 505–512) for impulsive loads to high reduced Reynolds number lubrication. The incompressible continuity equation and Navier-Stokes equations, including inertia terms, are simplified using an averaged velocity approach to obtain an extended form of short bearing Reynolds equation which applies to both laminar and turbulent flows. A full kinematic analysis of the short journal bearing is developed. Pressure profiles and linearized stiffness, damping and mass coefficients are calculated for different operating conditions. A time transient solution is developed. The change in the rotor displacements when subjected to unbalance forces is explored. Several comparisons between conventional Reynolds equation solutions and the extended Reynolds number form with temporal inertia effects are presented and discussed. In the specific cases considered in this paper, the primary conclusion is that the turbulence effects are significantly more important than inertia effects.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Plain journal bearing

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Figure 2

Dimensionless pressure profile P*(θ,z*=0) in steady-state, radial velocity, and radial acceleration at different Reynolds numbers under laminar and turbulent regime

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Figure 3

Mass elements versus steady-state eccentricity, Mxx*,Mxy*,Myx*,Myy* top through bottom, respectively

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Figure 4

Damping elements versus steady-state eccentricity, Cxx*,Cxy*,Cyx*,Cyy* top through bottom, respectively

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Figure 5

Stiffness elements versus steady-state eccentricity, Kxx*,Kxy*,Kyx*,Kyy* top through bottom, respectively

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Figure 6

Stability graph, mass parameter versus eccentricity ratio

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Figure 7

The path of rigid rotor in bearing at 1800 rpm (a) without unbalance force and (b) with unbalance force, Re*=0: No inertia, Re*=3.4: Laminar flow and Re*=3.4: Turbulence flow

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