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Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

Pressure Increase in Elliptical Impact Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Contacts With Longitudinal Asperities

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Kaneta

Faculty of Mechanical Engineering
Brno University of Technology
Technicka 2896/2, Brno 61669
Czech Republic
e-mail: kaneta@fme.vutbr.cz

F. Guo

e-mail: meguof@yahoo.com.cn

J. Wang

e-mail: 18669723895@163.com
School of Mechanical Engineering
Qingdao Technological University
11 Fushun Road
Qingdao 266033, P. R. C.

I. Krupka

e-mail: krupka@fme.vutbr.cz

M. Hartl

e-mail: hartl@fme.vutbr.cz
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering
Brno University of Technology
Technicka 2896/2
Brno 61669, Czech Republic

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Tribology. Manuscript received May 28, 2012; final manuscript received September 24, 2012; published online December 21, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Dong Zhu.

J. Tribol 135(1), 011503 (Dec 21, 2012) (6 pages) Paper No: TRIB-12-1086; doi: 10.1115/1.4007808 History: Received May 28, 2012; Revised September 24, 2012

The phenomena that occur when an elliptical steel body impacts a stationary steel plate with surface asperities are discussed through isothermal Newtonian numerical analysis using sinusoidal roughness. The ridges of the surface asperities produce large local pressures, especially at a large ellipticity ratio, when the surfaces are approaching each other under the applied load. The values of the local pressures are larger when the ridges are along the major axis than when the ridges are along the minor axis. Furthermore, as the loading speed increases, the pressure increases. As a result, the microgrooves are produced in the ridges and the horseshoe-shaped constrictions are formed at the ridges located around the contact edge.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Load – time curve

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Fig. 2

Film thickness and pressure contour maps and film thickness and pressure distributions of central ridge at X=0; ke=2, hini=2 μm, wmax/t0=10 N/ms

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Fig. 3

Film thickness contour map and film thickness and pressure distributions of central ridge at Y=0; ke=2, hini=0.2 μm, wmax/t0=10 N/ms

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Fig. 4

Film thickness and pressure distributions along the X axis corresponding to Fig. 2

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Fig. 5

Time variation of depth distribution of microgroove produced in the central ridges at X=0 and Y=0; ke=2, hini=2 μm, wmax/t0=10 N/ms

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Fig. 6

Film thickness and pressure distributions along central ridges at Y=0 and X=0; t=52.6 ms, ke=2,wmax/t0=50 N/ms

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Fig. 7

Depth distribution of microgroove produced in central ridges at Y=0 and X=0; t=52.6 ms, ke=2, wmax/t0=50 N/ms

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Fig. 8

Time variations of maximum pressure at the central ridges at Y=0 and X=0; ke=2, wmax/t0=50 N/ms

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Fig. 9

Pressure increase caused by a ridge parallel to the Y axis; t=52.6 ms, ke=2

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