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Research Papers: Contact Mechanics

Evolution of Maximum Contact Stresses in Amorphous Carbon Coated Silicon During Sliding Wear Against Si3N4 Ball

[+] Author and Article Information
P. Y. Zhang

Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, P.R.C.

D. F. Diao

Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, P.R.C.;
Nanosurface Science and Engineering Research Institute,
College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering,
Shenzhen University,
Shenzhen, 518060, P.R.C.
e-mail: dfdiao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received July 8, 2012; final manuscript received December 16, 2012; published online March 18, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Dong Zhu.

J. Tribol 135(2), 021401 (Mar 18, 2013) (10 pages) Paper No: TRIB-12-1110; doi: 10.1115/1.4023409 History: Received July 08, 2012; Revised December 16, 2012

The evolution of the maximum contact stresses in amorphous carbon coated silicon during sliding wear against a Si3N4 ball was investigated. Amorphous carbon coating was prepared on a silicon substrate by the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma sputtering method. Surface morphologies of the coating and counterpart were measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). The friction and wear behavior of the coating was studied by a ball-on-disk tribometer. The cross-sections of the wear tracks at different wear stages were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Maximum contact stresses with different coating thicknesses were calculated by the three-dimensional semi-analytical method (SAM). The results demonstrated that when taking surface asperities into consideration, maximum shear stress at the bonding interface and adjacent substrate showed a dramatic increase during wear and should be responsible for the initiation and propagation of the cracks observed at the final stage of sliding.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

AFM topographical images of (a) Si3N4 ball surface and (b) carbon coating surface measured at 20 × 20 μm2

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Fig. 2

Friction coefficients and mean wear depths of carbon coating during sliding wear against a Si3N4 ball. Insets are post-sliding SEM observations on cross-sections of the wear tracks of (a) 1500 cycles, (b) 7500 cycles, and (c) 18,500 cycles, respectively.

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Fig. 3

3D SAM contact model of Si3N4 ball and amorphous carbon coated substrate during sliding wear

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Fig. 4

Contour plots of the normalized tensile stress in the y = 0 plane for Ec/Eb = 1.086 and μ = 0.122; (a) t = 0.05a0, (b) t = 0.40a0, (c) t = a0, (d) t = 1.50a0

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Fig. 5

Contour plots of the normalized shear stress in the y = 0 plane for Ec/Eb = 1.086 and μ = 0.122; (a) t = 0.05a0, (b) t = 0.40a0, (c) t = a0, (d) t = 1.50a0

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Fig. 6

Contour plots of the normalized von Mises stress in the y = 0 plane for Ec/Eb = 1.086 and μ = 0.122; (a) t = 0.05a0, (b) t = 0.40a0, (c) t = a0, (d) t = 1.50a0

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Fig. 7

Evolution of the normalized maximum contact stresses (σ/Pmax)max with t/a0 change during sliding wear, (a) at the surface, (b) in the coating, (c) at the interface, (d) in the substrate for Ec/Eb = 1.086 and μ = 0.122, where ψT, ψS, and ψY refers to the maximum values of the normalized tensile stress (σxx/Pmax), normalized shear stress (σzx/Pmax) and normalized von Mises stress (σvm/Pmax), respectively

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Fig. 8

Comparisons between the normalized critical maximum contact pressures (Pmax,c/Hb) for initiation of shear (Pmax,S/Hb) and that for initiation of yield (Pmax,Y/Hb) with t/a0 change (a) at the surface, (b) in the coating, (c) at the interface, (d) in the substrate for Ec/Eb = 1.086 and μ = 0.122, where Sc/Sb and Yc/Yb are the shear strength ratio and the yield strength ratio of the coating to the substrate, respectively

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Fig. 9

Shear transition point calculated by evaluating a lower value of the normalized critical maximum contact pressure for the shear (Pmax,S/Hb) at four positions with t/a0 change during sliding wear in the coating-substrate system for Ec/Eb = 1.086, Sc/Sb = 1.084, and μ = 0.122

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