0
Research Papers: Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

A Simplified Thermal Analysis of Elastohydrodynamic Contacts

[+] Author and Article Information
Raynald Guilbault

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
École de Technologie Supérieure,
1100 Notre-Dame Street West,
Montreal, QC, H3C 1K3, Canada
e-mail: raynald.guilbault@etsmtl.ca

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received April 16, 2012; final manuscript received November 9, 2012; published online February 22, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Dong Zhu.

J. Tribol 135(2), 021502 (Feb 22, 2013) (13 pages) Paper No: TRIB-12-1058; doi: 10.1115/1.4023085 History: Received April 16, 2012; Revised November 09, 2012

Under elastohydrodynamic (EHL) conditions, the temperature in the contact zone determines the load resistance of the lubricant film. Therefore, an efficient assessment of the scuffing risks requires accurate contact temperature predictions. The work presented in this paper develops a simple and prompt temperature model exploitable within any thermal EHL modeling approach. The model incorporates a multilayer lubricant film representation for the heat equation solution. The developments also include an original heat repartition factor expression and a simple formula for handling intermediate values of the Peclet number. The rolling/sliding conditions in the inlet cause temperature rises that also affect the film resistance in the contact zone; this study proposes an inlet temperature rise equation. This formula offers temperature predictions in agreement with reference values. The contact zone temperature predictions for the line of contact problem under sliding/rolling conditions agree remarkably well with published numerical results; for the evaluations presenting the higher absolute difference, the correspondence remained over 94% and 95% for the maximum and mean temperatures, respectively. Both line and elliptical contact conditions were tested and compared to experimental data available in the literature. The analysis evidenced the precision of the estimates; thus attesting to the accuracy of the model under any contact conditions. Finally, the results indicate that, depending on the pressure and speed combination, the shearing zone may occupy around 30% of the film thickness.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Multilayer film representation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Oil film thermal circuit

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Flow chart of the model solution

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Temperature distributions at the middle position (y = 0), Ud = 7.3 × 10−11: (a) Average film temperature, (b) Maximum film temperature, (c) Fast disk surface temperature, (d) Slow disk surface temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

2D temperature distribution across the film at y = 0, Ud = 7.3 ×10−11 and Sr = 30%

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Glass transition of various hydrocarbon oils (reproduced from Ref. [11])

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Coefficients of friction and temperature for contact line conditions and a constant rolling speed of 400 cm/s: (a) Experimental [5] and calculated coefficients of friction, (b) Average maximum film temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Coefficients of friction and temperature for contact line conditions and a constant load of 12.5 kN: (a) Experimental [5] and calculated coefficients of friction, (b) Averaged maximum film temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Calculated f values

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Coefficients of friction and temperature for elliptical contact conditions and a constant rolling speed of 7.5 m/s: (a) Experimental [25] and calculated coefficients of friction, (b) Averaged maximum film temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Calculated f values

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Maximum temperature for elliptical contact conditions and a constant rolling speed of 7.5 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Coefficients of friction and temperature for circular contact conditions and a constant rolling speed of 2.0 m/s: (a) Experimental [30] and calculated coefficients of friction, (b) Maximum film temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Calculated f values for circular contact conditions and a constant rolling speed of 2.0 m/s

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In