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Research Papers: Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

Influence of Surface Roughness Lay Directionality on Scuffing Failure of Lubricated Point Contacts

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Li

The Ohio State University,
201 West 19th Avenue,
Columbus, OH 43210
e-mail: li.600@osu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Tribology. Manuscript received February 18, 2013; final manuscript received May 28, 2013; published online June 27, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Dong Zhu.

J. Tribol 135(4), 041502 (Jun 27, 2013) (10 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1048; doi: 10.1115/1.4024783 History: Received February 18, 2013; Revised May 28, 2013

The influence of roughness lay directionality on scuffing failure is studied considering different roughness lay direction combinations of the contacting surfaces of a ball-on-disk contact. Using a recently developed scuffing model Li et al., (2013, “A Model to Predict Scuffing Failures of a Ball-On-Disk Contact,” Tribol. Int., 60, pp. 233–245)., the bulk temperature and flash temperature are predicted for each roughness lay combination within the load range from 0.76 GPa to 2.47 GPa in a step-wise manner under the rolling velocity of 10 m/s and slide-to-roll ratio of −0.5 to show substantial impacts of roughness lay directionality on scuffing resistance performance (SRP). It is found (i) the lay direction combination that results into contacts of asperities with small contact radii leads to increased local contact pressures and frictional heat flux, reducing SRP; (ii) the continuous asperity contact along the sliding direction leads to continuous surface temperature rise and lowers SRP; and (iii) the lubricant side leakage caused by the pressure gradient in the direction normal to the sliding direction leads to reduced SRP. With these main mechanisms in effect, the SRP of a contact decreases as the deviation between the roughness texture orientations of the two surfaces increases. The surfaces with their roughness lay directions both perpendicular to the sliding direction exhibits best SRP. The surfaces with one roughness lay direction positioned in line with the direction of sliding and the other positioned perpendicular to the sliding direction shows worst SRP.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic view of the ball-on-disk contact

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Fig. 2

Step-wise load and Hertzian pressure for a complete ball-on-disk scuffing simulation

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Fig. 3

(a) Definition of roughness lay direction angle θi for surface i (i=1,2) and (b) example roughness profile (Eq. (21a) with θi=90° and t=0) to show sharp valleys and relatively smooth peaks

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Fig. 4

Pressure-viscosity relationship of Mil-PRF-23699 lubricant used in this study

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Fig. 5

Tb1, T1max and μ for Cases (a) I1, (b) II, (c) III, (d) IV, (e) V, (f) VI, (g) VII, (h) VIII, and (i) IX as defined in Table 1. Red arrow points to the time when T1max reaches Tr=350 oC

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Fig. 6

Relationship between phr and |θ1-θ2| for different roughness lay direction combinations as defined in Table 1

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Fig. 7

T1 distribution at the loading stage where T1max reaches Tr=350 oC for Cases (a) I1, (b) II, (c) III, (d) IV, (e) V, (f) VI, (g) VII, (h) VIII, and (i) IX as defined in Table 1

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Fig. 8

p distribution at the loading stage where T1max reaches Tr=350 oC for Cases (a) I1, (b) II, (c) III, (d) IV, (e) V, (f) VI, (g) VII, (h) VIII, and (i) IX as defined in Table 1

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Fig. 9

q distribution at the loading stage where T1max reaches Tr=350 oC for Cases (a) I1, (b) II, (c) III, (d) IV, (e) V, (f) VI, (g) VII, (h) VIII, and (i) IX as defined in Table 1

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Fig. 10

Asperity contact patterns at the loading stage where T1max reaches Tr=350 oC for Cases (a) I1, (b) II, (c) III, (d) IV, (e) V, (f) VI, (g) VII, (h) VIII, and (i) IX as defined in Table 1

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Fig. 11

Comparisons of (a) T1 and (b) q distributions for the diagonal cases of Fig. 7 at y=yTmax

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Fig. 12

Comparisons of (a) T1 and (b) q distributions for the off diagonal cases of VIII (|θ1-θ2|=30°), II (|θ1-θ2|=60°), and III (|θ1-θ2|=90°) at y=yTmax

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