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Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Influence of Minimum Quantity Lubrication on Friction Coefficient and Work-Material Adhesion During Machining of Cast Aluminum With Various Cutting Tool Substrates Made of Polycrystalline Diamond, High Speed Steel, and Carbides

[+] Author and Article Information
Pierre Faverjon

e-mail: pierre.faverjon@enise.fr

Joël Rech

e-mail: joel.rech@enise.fr
Université de Lyon,
ENISE,
LTDS, UMR CNRS 5513,
58 Rue Jean Parot,
Saint-Étienne 42023, France

René Leroy

Université de Tours,
Polytech Tours,
site Dassault,
7 avenue Marcel Dassault,
Tours 37200, France
e-mail: rene.leroy@univ-tours.fr

*Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Tribology. Manuscript received August 24, 2012; final manuscript received April 23, 2013; published online June 27, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Robert Wood.

J. Tribol 135(4), 041602 (Jun 27, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: TRIB-12-1133; doi: 10.1115/1.4024546 History: Received August 24, 2012; Revised April 23, 2013

Due to the increasing emphasis on environmental constraints, industry works on how to limit the massive use of lubricants by using the micro-pulverization of oil in machining processes and, especially, in the machining of aluminum alloys for the automotive industry. The success of a machining operation is dependent on a friction coefficient and weak adhesion with the tool-work material interface. This paper aims at identifying the influence of cutting tool substrates (high speed steel (HSS), carbide, polycrystalline diamond (PCD)) and of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) on the friction coefficient and on adhesion in tribological conditions corresponding to the ones observed in the cutting of aluminum alloys (sliding velocity: 20-1500 m/min). An open ball-on-cylinder tribometer, especially designed to simulate these tribological conditions through Hertz contact, has been used. It has been shown that HSS and carbide substrates lead to large friction coefficients (0.8–1) and substantial adhesion in dry conditions, whereas PCD substrates would lead to lower average friction coefficient values (0.4–0.5) and very limited adhesion, which proves the necessity of using PCD tools in the dry machining of aluminum. It has also been shown that the application of MQL leads to a large decrease of the friction coefficient (0.1–0.2) and eliminates almost all traces of adhesions on pins for any substrates, which shows that MQL is an interesting compromise between dry machining and flood cooling.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Principle of the tribometer [23]

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Fig. 2

Sticking on pins after the tribotest

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Fig. 3

Contact area at the pin/work material interface

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Fig. 4

Evolution of the apparent friction coefficient with HSS substrates

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Fig. 5

Work material adhesion on HSS pins after the tribotest

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Fig. 6

Evolution of the apparent friction coefficient with carbide substrates

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Fig. 7

Work material adhesion on the carbide pins after the tribotest

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Fig. 8

Evolution of the apparent friction coefficient with PCD substrates

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Fig. 9

Work material adhesion on the PCD pins after the tribotest

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Fig. 10

Comparison of the apparent friction coefficient with the HSS, PCD, and carbide substrates for sliding speeds from 20 to 100 m/min

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Fig. 11

Comparison of adhered aluminum on the HSS, PCD, and carbide pins for sliding speeds from 20 to 100 m/min

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Fig. 12

Comparison of the apparent friction coefficient with the PCD and carbide substrates for sliding speeds from 100 to 800 m/min

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Fig. 13

Comparison of the adhered aluminum on the PCD and carbide pins for sliding speeds from 100 to 800 m/min

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