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Research Papers: Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

Multiscale Analysis of the Roughness Effect on Lubricated Rough Contact

[+] Author and Article Information
Ibrahim Demirci

e-mail: ibrahim.demirci@ensam.eu

Sabeur Mezghani

e-mail: sabeur.mezghani@ensam.eu
MSMP,
Arts et Métiers Paristech,
Rue Saint Dominique, BP 508,
Châlons en Champagne 51006, France

Mohammed Yousfi

Direction de l'Ingénierie Mécanique,
Renault S.A.S,
67 Rue Des Bons Raisins,
Rueil Malmaison 92500, France
e-mail: mohammed.yousfi@renault.com

Mohamed El Mansori

MSMP,
Arts et Métiers Paristech,
Rue Saint Dominique, BP 508,
Châlons en Champagne 51006, France
e-mail: Mohamed.elmansori@ensam.eu

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received October 24, 2012; final manuscript received July 21, 2013; published online September 23, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Robert L. Jackson.

J. Tribol 136(1), 011501 (Sep 23, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: TRIB-12-1185; doi: 10.1115/1.4025222 History: Received October 24, 2012; Revised July 21, 2013

Determining friction is as equally essential as determining the film thickness in the lubricated contact, and is an important research subject. Indeed, reduction of friction in the automotive industry is important for both the minimization of fuel consumption as well as the decrease in the emissions of greenhouse gases. However, the progress in friction reduction has been limited by the difficulty in understanding the mechanism of roughness effects on friction. It was observed that micro-surface geometry or roughness was one of the major factors that affected the friction coefficient. In the present study, a new methodology coupling the multiscale decomposition of the surface and the prediction of the friction coefficient by numerical simulation was developed to understand the influence of the scale of roughness in the friction coefficient. In particular, the real surface decomposed in different roughness scale by multiscale decomposition, based on ridgelets transform, was used as input into the model. This model predicts the effect of scale on mixed elastohydroynamic point contact. The results indicate a good influence of the fine scale of surface roughness on the friction coefficient for full-film lubrication as well as a beginning of improvement for mixed lubrication.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

Honed surface with different finer scale limit (a) original plateau-honed surface and surface after removing (b) 0.12 mm scale, (c) 0.24 mm scale, (d) 0.48 mm scale, and (e) 0.96 mm scale

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Fig. 2

(a) Original plateau-honed surface and its decomposition at different scales level from waviness to roughness with (b) 1.92 mm, (c) 0.96 mm, (d) 0.48 mm, (e) 0.24 mm, and (f) 0.12 mm scale

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Fig. 1

Film thickness and pressure profile for validation of the present study compared to the research of Hu and Zhu [44]

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Fig. 4

Fiction coefficient as a function of scale for u1 = 2 m⋅s–1 and (a) Srr = 2.0

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Fig. 5

Contact load ratio as a function of scale for u1 = 2 m⋅s–1 and Srr = 2.0

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Fig. 6

Fiction coefficient as a function of scale for u1 = 0.5 m⋅s–1 and Srr = 2.0

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Fig. 7

Contact load ratio as a function of scale u1 = 0.5 m⋅s–1 and Srr = 2.0

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