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Research Papers: Hydrodynamic Lubrication

An Experimental Hydrodynamic Thrust Bearing Device and Its Application to the Study of a Tapered-Land Thrust Bearing

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. Henry, J. Bouyer, M. Fillon

Dept. Genie Mecanique et Systémes Complexes,
Institut Pprime,
CNRS-University of Poitiers-ENSMA,
UPR 3346,
SP2MI, 11 Boulevard Marie & Pierre Curie,
BP 30179, Futuroscope
Chasseneuil Cedex 86962, France

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received August 19, 2013; final manuscript received November 18, 2013; published online February 5, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Jordan Liu.

J. Tribol 136(2), 021703 (Feb 05, 2014) (11 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1166; doi: 10.1115/1.4026080 History: Received August 19, 2013; Revised November 18, 2013

An experimental study is presented with the main objective of understanding the hydrodynamic behavior of a tapered-land thrust bearing with fixed geometry. The experimental results were obtained using an original test rig designed at the “Institut Pprime.” Extensive instrumentation applied to the thrust bearing allows a precise evaluation of various characteristics such as the temperature, the film thickness and the friction torque. The results are in good agreement with the findings of other surveys in the literature. However, large differences between the measured parameters were observed from one pad to another. The authors demonstrate that this is due to the imperfections on the active surface, produced during machining. For a better understanding of the influence of irregularities in the flatness, the test was repeated with a thrust bearing manufactured using a high-precision surface polishing process. Experimental results with respect to the real geometry of the bearings were presented with both processes being compared. Interesting features, such as hot spots and a pressure peak, were identified on the pad at different supply temperatures and inlet pressures. This experimental study significantly advances the comprehension of the hydrodynamic behavior of tapered-land thrust bearings.

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
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References

Harika, E., Hélène, M., Bouyer, J., and Fillon, M., 2011, “Impact of Lubricant Contamination With Water on Hydrodynamic Thrust Bearing Performance,” Mech. Ind., 12, pp. 353–359.
Stewart, B., 1999, “Influence of Oil Injection Method on Thrust Bearing Performance at Low Flow Conditions,” Proceedings of the 28th Turbomachinery Symposium, pp. 133–140.
Dadouche, A., Fillon, M., and Bligoud, J., 2000, “Experiments on Thermal Effects in a Hydrodynamic Thrust Bearing,” Tribol. Int., 33(3–4), pp. 167–174. [CrossRef]
Sharma, R., and Pandey, R., 2009, “Experimental Studies of Pressure Distributions in Finite Slider Bearing With Single Continuous Surface Profiles on the Pads,” Tribol. Int., 42(7), pp. 1040–1045. [CrossRef]
Ahmed, S., Fillon, M., and Maspeyrot, P., 2009, “Influence of Pad and Runner Mechanical Deformations on the Performance of a Hydrodynamic Fixed Geometry Thrust Bearing,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., Part J: J. Eng. Tribol., 224(4), pp. 305–315. [CrossRef]
Brockett, T., Barret, L., and Allaire, P., 1996, “Thermoelastohydrodynamic Analysis of Fixed Geometry Thrust Bearings Including Runner Deformation,” Tribol. Trans., 39(3), pp. 555–562. [CrossRef]
Xu, G., and Sadeghi, F., 1998, “A Thermal Elastohydrodynamic Lubricated Thrust Bearing Contact Model,” Proceedings of the International Compressor Engineering Conference, Vol. 1226.
Bouyer, J., Hanahashi, M., Fillon, M., and Fujita, M., 2012, “Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Materials on the Behaviour of a Hydrodynamic Tilting Pad Thrust Bearing,” Proceedings of the NordTrib International Tribology Conference, Vol. 153, pp. 1–5.
Harika, E., Bouyer, J., Fillon, M., and Hélène, M., 2013, “Measurements of Lubrication Characteristics of a Tilting Pad Thrust Bearing Disturbed by a Water-Contaminated Lubricant,” IMechE Conf. Trans., 227(1), pp. 16–25.
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Photograph of the thrust bearing test rig

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Fig. 2

Sectional schematic view of the test apparatus: test rig arrangement

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Fig. 3

Sectional schematic view of the test apparatus: support to test the thrust bearing

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Fig. 4

Method of the minimum gap measurement

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Fig. 5

Test cell: friction torque device

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Fig. 6

Hydraulic pipe for pressure measurement

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Fig. 7

Thrust bearing geometry and the locations of the thermocouples and static pressure sensors on the active surface

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Fig. 8

Photograph of the thrust bearing

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Fig. 10

Flatness deformation of the active surface of the thrust bearing with the polishing process

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Fig. 9

Flatness deformation of the active surface of the thrust bearing with the grinding process

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Fig. 11

Profile at the mean radius of the thrust bearing with polishing and grinding surface finishing

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Fig. 12

Temperature at 75% of the pad length and 75% of the pad radius versus the applied load for nominal supply conditions

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Fig. 13

Temperature at 75%–75% of the TBGS versus the applied load at 6,000 rpm for each pad for nominal supply conditions

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Fig. 14

Temperature at 75%–75% of the TBPS versus the applied load at 6,000 rpm for each pad for nominal supply conditions

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Fig. 15

Pressure at 70%–50% versus the applied load for nominal supply conditions

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Fig. 16

Experimental results for nominal supply conditions: (a), (c), and (e) temperature, and (b), (d), and (f) pressure at, respectively, 2,000 rpm, 2,000 N; 2,000 rpm, 8,000 N; and 10,000 rpm, 8,000 N for (g) the same pad

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Fig. 17

Minimal film thickness versus the applied load for nominal supply conditions

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Fig. 18

Viscosity of ISO VG 46 mineral oil versus the temperature

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Fig. 19

Friction torque versus the applied load for nominal supply conditions

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Fig. 20

Variation in the operating parameters as a function of load at 6,000 rpm

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Fig. 21

Experimental temperature and pressure fields at 6,000 rpm and 8,000 N at 0.1 MPa supply pressure and 40 °C supply temperature for both thrust bearings: (a) and (b) TBPS and (c) and (d) TBGS

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Fig. 22

Friction torque and minimum film thickness versus the applied load at 6,000 rpm for several supply conditions: (a) and (c) temperature supply fixed at 40 °C for three supply pressures: 0.05 MPa, 0.1 MPa, and 0.15 MPa; (b) and (d) supply pressure fixed at 0.1 MPa for three supply temperatures: 40 °C, 50 °C, and 60 °C

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Fig. 23

Experimental temperature and pressure fields at 6,000 rpm and 8,000 N at 0.1 MPa supply pressure for several temperature supplies: (a) and (b) supply temperature 40 °C; (c) and (d) supply temperature 50 °C; and (e) and (f) supply temperature 60 °C

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