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Research Papers: Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

Temperature Analysis of Involute Gear Based on Mixed Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Theory Considering Tribo-Dynamic Behaviors

[+] Author and Article Information
Hui L. Dong

National Key Laboratory of
Vehicular Transmission,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China
e-mail: 10903078@bit.edu.cn

Ji B. Hu

National Key Laboratory of
Vehicular Transmission,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China
e-mail: hujibin@bit.edu.cn

Xue Y. Li

National Key Laboratory of
Vehicular Transmission,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China
e-mail: bitlxy@163.com

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received June 14, 2013; final manuscript received December 9, 2013; published online February 5, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Dong Zhu.

J. Tribol 136(2), 021504 (Feb 05, 2014) (13 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1119; doi: 10.1115/1.4026347 History: Received June 14, 2013; Revised December 09, 2013

An integrated model is proposed for involute gear pair combining the mixed elastodhydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) theory for finite line contact with surface temperature rise equations considering tribo-dynamic loading behaviors. The film stiffness and viscous damping as well as the friction force are taken into account. The surface topography of tooth flank measured by 3D surface profiler is also included to solve the local temperature and pressure distribution in the contact area. The results show that the temperature distributions in different meshing positions along the line of action exhibit dissimilar characteristics due to the varying of dynamic load and the changing slip-to-roll ratio, which denotes the relationship between sliding velocity and rolling velocity on the tooth flank. Besides, the maximum of temperature is likely to appear at different sides of the gear tooth width as the gear pair meshes along the line of action. Moreover, with the increasing surface roughness, the ratio of asperity contacts becomes larger, so more heat generates from the contact area and leads to higher temperature rise.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematics of the meshing helical gear

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Fig. 2

Coordinate of lubrication model

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Fig. 3

Dynamic model of a gear pair

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Fig. 4

Flowchart of computation program

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Fig. 5

Temperature sensors installed on the wheel

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Fig. 6

Validation of the temperature rise model

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Fig. 7

Dynamic force of helical gear and spur gear

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Fig. 8

Variation of contact length LoA

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Fig. 9

Rolling velocity and sliding velocity

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Fig. 10

Temperatures in meshing positions: L1, L2, L3, L4, and L5

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Fig. 11

Temperature on the y = 0 plane and x = 0 plane in meshing positions L1, L35

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Fig. 12

Variation of maximum temperature along LoA

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Fig. 13

Surface topography

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Fig. 14

Temperature rise with sinusoidal surface

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Fig. 15

Temperature distribution and heat partition coefficient on the plane y = 0 and x = 0

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Fig. 16

Pressure distribution and film thickness on the plane y = 0 and x = 0

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Fig. 17

Measured tooth surface topography

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Fig. 18

Temperature distribution with measured tooth surface roughness

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Fig. 19

Film temperature and temperature on tooth surface

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