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Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Vacuum Tribological Properties of a Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb Intermetallics

[+] Author and Article Information
Jun Cheng

State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication,
Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Lanzhou 730000, China;
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100039, China

Jiqiang Ma, Licai Fu, Zhuhui Qiao

State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication,
Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Lanzhou 730000, China

Yuan Yu

State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication,
Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Lanzhou 730000, China;
State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an, China

Jun Yang

State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication,
Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Lanzhou 730000, China
e-mail: jyang@lzb.ac.cn;
jyang@licp.cas.cn

Jinshan Li

State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an, China

Weimin Liu

State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication,
Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Lanzhou 730000, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received July 11, 2013; final manuscript received November 18, 2013; published online January 20, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Robert Wood.

J. Tribol 136(2), 021604 (Jan 20, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1136; doi: 10.1115/1.4026079 History: Received July 11, 2013; Revised November 18, 2013

In order to investigate the vacuum tribological properties of a Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy, dry-sliding tribological tests of the alloy against AISI 52,100 steel ball under different sliding speeds and loads were performed at a high vacuum of 4.0 × 10−4 Pa by ball-on-disk rotating configuration, and the same tests were done in air for comparative purposes. It is an important finding that the TiAl intermetallics have good wear resistance in vacuum, not like that in air. The wear rate of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy in vacuum is almost lower by an order of magnitude than that in air.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The XRD pattern (a) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) image (b) of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy

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Fig. 2

The schematic picture of the experimental setup

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Fig. 3

Typical curves of the friction coefficient of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy with sliding time in air (a) and vacuum (b) at an applied load of 3 N and a sliding speed of 0.188 m/s

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Fig. 4

Variations of the friction coefficient of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy with the load at the sliding speed of 0.188 m/s under air and vacuum

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Fig. 5

Variations of the friction coefficient of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy with the sliding speed at the applied load of 3 N under air and vacuum

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Fig. 6

The wear rate of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb samples at different applied loads with a sliding speed of 0.188 m/s under air and vacuum

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Fig. 7

The wear rate of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb samples at different sliding speeds with an applied load of 3 N under air and vacuum

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Fig. 8

SEM images showing the morphologies of the worn surfaces of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy at different applied loads with a sliding speed of 0.188 m/s after sliding for 30 min

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Fig. 9

SEM images showing the morphologies of the worn surfaces of the Ti-46Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy at different sliding speeds with the applied load of 3 N after sliding for 30 min

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Fig. 10

SEM images showing the morphologies of the worn surfaces and EDS spectra of the marked area by square of the coupled balls under vacuum (a) and air (b) at the applied load of 3 N with a sliding speed of 0.188 m/s

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Fig. 11

3D images and profiles of the worn surfaces in air (a) and vacuum (b) at the applied load of 3 N with a sliding speed of 0.188 m/s

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