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Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Thermal Degradation and Burnishing Wear of Thin Carbon Film by Frictional Heat Generation

[+] Author and Article Information
Sungae Lee

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas Tech University,
Box 41021,
Lubbock, TX 79409
e-mail: sa.lee@ttu.edu

Muyang He

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas Tech University,
Box 41021,
Lubbock, TX 79409
e-mail: muyang.he@ttu.edu

Chang-Dong Yeo

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas Tech University,
Box 41021,
Lubbock, TX 79409
e-mail: changdong.yeo@ttu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received November 13, 2013; final manuscript received May 16, 2014; published online June 6, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Zhong Min Jin.

J. Tribol 136(4), 041603 (Jun 06, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1234; doi: 10.1115/1.4027749 History: Received November 13, 2013; Revised May 16, 2014

The burnishing wear of carbon films found in dynamic microdevices could be attributed to both mechanical stress and temperature rise by frictional heat generation. In this study, novel modeling and experiment were performed to investigate the burnishing wear mechanism of carbon film during high speed sliding contact. An improved thermomechanical contact model for a single asperity was extended to rough surface contact. The contact stress and surface temperature rise were examined at various contact conditions. To verify the thermal degradation of the carbon film by frictional heat flux, micro-Raman spectroscopy measurement was performed on actual burnishing failure sample.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

A schematic of contact behavior in the improved single asperity model [17]

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Fig. 2

A schematic of substrate deformation and asperity interactions during rough surface contact [19]

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Fig. 3

A schematic of the heat transfer mechanism during continuous sliding contact

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Fig. 4

A schematic of nodes for the finite difference method of convection heat transfer out of the contact zone

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Fig. 5

The contour and distribution of contact pressure for the disk surface contacting with slider consisting of (a) NiFe substrate and (b) Al2O3 substrate

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Fig. 6

The contour and distribution of temperature for the disk surface contacting with slider consisting of (a) NiFe substrate and (b) Al2O3 substrate. Note: the white area indicates no temperature rise during contact

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Fig. 7

The contour and distribution of temperature for the head slider surface made of NiFe substrate at the sliding time of (a) 10 ns and (b) 1 μs. Note: the white area indicates no temperature rise during contact

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Fig. 8

The contour and distribution of temperature for the head slider surface made of Al2O3 substrate at the sliding time of (a) 10 ns and (b) 1 μs. Note: the white area indicates no temperature rise during contact

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Fig. 9

Thermomechanical contact behaviors of head slider with respect to the sliding time; (a) the number ratio of critical asperities and (b) the average temperature over the nominal area

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Fig. 10

Micro-Raman spectroscopy measurement for the burnished head carbon film sample; (a) A SEM image of a typical slider surface including the location of Raman measurement [33] and (b) a representative of Raman spectra from the burnished head carbon film (D and G peaks only)

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