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Research Papers: Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Analysis of Point Contacts With Consideration of Material Inhomogeneity

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhang Shengguang, Zhao Ziqiang

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China

Wang Wenzhong

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China
e-mail: wangwzhong@bit.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received February 11, 2014; final manuscript received May 11, 2014; published online June 19, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Dong Zhu.

J. Tribol 136(4), 041501 (Jun 19, 2014) (13 pages) Paper No: TRIB-14-1041; doi: 10.1115/1.4027750 History: Received February 11, 2014; Revised May 11, 2014

Inhomogeneities in matrix may significantly affect the performance of mechanical elements, such as possible fatigue life reduction for rolling bearing due to stress concentration induced by inhomogeneities; on the other hand, most components operate under lubrication environment. So far the numerical algorithms to solve lubrication problems without the consideration of inhomogeneities or inclusions are well developed. In this paper, the combination of elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) and inclusion problem is realized to consider the effect of material inhomogeneity on the lubrication performance and subsurface stress distribution, etc. The matrix inhomogeneity will induce disturbed displacement, which will modify the film thickness and consequently result in the change of lubricated contact pressure distribution, etc. The matrix inhomogeneity is treated as the homogeneous inclusion with equivalent eigenstrain according to equivalent inclusion method (EIM), and the disturbed displacement is calculated by semi-analytical method (SAM). While the pressure and film thickness distributions are obtained by solving Reynolds equation. The iterative process is realized to consider the interaction between lubrication behavior and material response. The results show the inhomogeneity in contacting body will greatly influence the lubricated contact performance. The influences are different between compliant and stiff inhomogeneity. It is also found that different sizes and positions of inhomogeneity can significantly affect the contact characteristic parameters.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Flowchart for present method

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Fig. 2

The comparing of two models

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Fig. 3

Comparison of the mean values of the eigenstrain in the inclusion region between the present method and Eshelby's analytical model

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Fig. 4

The eigenstresses caused by the spherical inclusion with uniform dilatational eigenstrain. (a) y = 0 cross section of a spherical inclusion embedded in the half space. (b) The stress components along x-axis by analytical and numerical methods. (c) The stress components along x′-axis by analytical and numerical methods. (d) The stress components along z-axis by analytical and numerical methods.

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Fig. 5

The size and position of a single inclusion

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Fig. 6

The pressure distributions of different sizes of inclusions in the same depth h*= 0.375a

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Fig. 7

The values of pressure peaks and valleys for different depths and sizes of inclusion. (a) Stiff inhomogeneity and (b) compliant inhomogeneity.

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Fig. 8

The values of pressure peaks and valleys in different depths and sizes. (a) Stiff inhomogeneity and (b) compliant inhomogeneity.

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Fig. 9

The oil film thickness distribution of some inclusions in the depth h*= 0.125a

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Fig. 10

The change of minimum film thickness against the inhomogeneity depth for different sizes

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Fig. 11

The change of central film thickness against the inhomogeneity depth for different sizes

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Fig. 12

The profile of surface disturbed displacement for different inhomogeneity sizes and stiffness

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Fig. 13

The change of disturbed displacement against inhomogeneity depth for different sizes. (a) Compliant inhomogeneity and (b) stiff inhomogeneity.

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Fig. 14

The von Mises stress distribution in the plane Y = 0 for stiff inhomogeneity (α = 2) with the size D = 0.125a. (a) α = 1; (b) h*= 0.25a; (c) h*= 0.5a; (d) h*= 0.75a; (e) h*= 1.5a; and (f) h*= 2.25a.

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Fig. 15

The von Mises stresses along the Z-axis. (a) D = 0.125a and (b) D = 0.75a.

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Fig. 16

The computation time of the present model including a single inhomogeneity with different sizes

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Fig. 17

The sizes and locations of multiple inhomogeneities

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Fig. 18

The pressure and film thickness distributions with different inclusions (D = 0.125a, d = 0.25a). (a) Pressure distributions and (b) film thickness distributions.

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Fig. 19

The pressure and film thickness distributions with different inclusions (D = 0.125a, d = 0.125a). (a) Pressure distributions and (b) film thickness distributions.

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Fig. 20

The von Mises stresses distributions with different kinds of inclusions and different depths in the plane Y = 0 (D = 0.125a, d = 0.25a). (a) α = 2, h*= 0.125a; (b) α = 2, h*= 0.375a; (c) α = 2, h*= 0.625a; (d) α = 0.5, h*= 0.125a; (e) α = 0.5, h*= 0.375a; and (f) α = 0.5, h*= 0.625a.

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Fig. 21

The results for randomly distributed inhomogeneities. (a) The schematic figure of randomly distributed inhomogeneities in the computation domain. (b) The pressure and film thickness distribution. (c) The disturbed displacement distribution.

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Fig. 22

The von Mises stress distribution in plane Y = 0

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