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Research Papers: Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

Effect of Nanotexturing on Increase in Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Oil Film Thickness

[+] Author and Article Information
Tomoko Hirayama

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Doshisha University,
1-3 Miyakodani, Tatara, Kyotanabe,
Kyoto 610-0394, Japan;
PRESTO,
Japan Science and Technology Agency,
4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi,
Saitama 332-0012, Japan
e-mail: thirayam@mail.doshisha.ac.jp

Mitsutaka Ikeda

Graduate School of Science and Engineering,
Doshisha University,
1-3 Miyakodani, Tatara, Kyotanabe,
Kyoto 610-0394, Japan

Toshiteru Suzuki

Graduate School of Science and Engineering,
Doshisha University,
1-3 Miyakodani, Tatara, Kyotanabe,
Kyoto 610-0394, Japan

Takashi Matsuoka

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Doshisha University,
1-3 Miyakodani, Tatara, Kyotanabe,
Kyoto 610-0394, Japan

Hiroshi Sawada, Kosuke Kawahara

Canon Machinery Inc.,
85 Minamiyamada-cho, Kusatsu,
Shiga 525-8511, Japan

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received September 18, 2013; final manuscript received February 25, 2014; published online April 25, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Xiaolan Ai.

J. Tribol 136(3), 031501 (Apr 25, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1200; doi: 10.1115/1.4027286 History: Received September 18, 2013; Revised February 25, 2014; Accepted March 15, 2014

The effects of nanotexturing on oil film thickness and shape under pointcontact elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) conditions were experimentally investigated. A disk-onball friction tester with an optical interferometer was used to measure oil film thickness and to observe the oil film shape. Periodic groove structures with a spiral, perpendicular, or parallel shape and with various groove depths and distances were formed by irradiation of a femtosecond laser onto the surface of steel balls. These nanotextured balls were tested under a load of 20 N and at rotational speeds from 1.0 to 3.0 m/s. Most of the balls with nanotexturing had a thicker oil film than those without texturing. The groove depth and angle were the key parameters determining the thickness of the oil film as they controlled the amount of side leakage of oil from the contact point. Optimization of these parameters resulted in an oil film that was almost twice as thick as that on the ball without texturing.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Disk-on-ball type experimental apparatus with an optical interferometer used to measure thickness of oil film between disk and ball and to observe film shape

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Fig. 2

Textured ball and AFM-scanned surface image; groove parameter definitions

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Fig. 3

Images of oil film at various rotational speeds for nontextured ball and textured balls A, B, and C with spiral grooves

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Fig. 4

Oil film thickness at center of contact area for nontextured ball and textured balls A, B, and C at various rotational speeds

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Fig. 5

Cross-sectional oil film shapes for nontextured ball and textured balls A, B, and C at 2.0 m/s

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Fig. 6

Images of oil film at various rotational speeds for textured ball D with perpendicular grooves in the rotational direction

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Fig. 7

Oil film thickness at center of contact area for nontextured ball and textured balls C and D at various rotational speeds

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Fig. 8

Cross-sectional oil film shapes for nontextured ball and textured balls C and D at 2.0 m/s

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Fig. 9

Images of oil film at various rotational speeds for textured ball B for normal and reverse rotations

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Fig. 10

Images of oil film at various rotational speeds for step balls E and F with several 100 nm steps

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Fig. 11

Oil film thickness at center of contact area for nontextured ball and step balls E and F at various rotational speeds

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Fig. 12

Images of oil film at various rotational speeds for textured balls G, H, and I with spiral grooves

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Fig. 13

Oil film thickness at center of contact area for textured balls with various groove distances at 3.0 m/s. (a) Groove depth of 100 nm. (b) Groove depth of 200 nm.

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Fig. 14

Image of oil film at various rotational speeds for textured ball J with parallel grooves

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Fig. 15

Oil film thickness at center of contact area for textured balls with various groove angles at 3.0 m/s

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Fig. 16

Oil film thickness at center of contact area for selected textured balls with various groove dimensions at 3.0 m/s

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