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Research Papers: Hydrodynamic Lubrication

Designing Aerostatic Bearing With Counterbalancing Gaps for Lifting a Heavy Payload

[+] Author and Article Information
Nripen Mondal

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Jadavpur University,
Kolkata 700 032, India
e-mail: nripen_mondal@rediffmail.com

Rana Saha

Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Jadavpur University,
Kolkata 700 032, India
e-mail: rsaha@mech.jdvu.ac.in

Dipankar Sanyal

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Jadavpur University,
Kolkata 700 032, India
e-mail: dsanyal@mech.jdvu.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received July 4, 2013; final manuscript received February 9, 2014; published online March 25, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Daniel Nélias.

J. Tribol 136(3), 031701 (Mar 25, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1133; doi: 10.1115/1.4026887 History: Received July 04, 2013; Revised February 09, 2014

An aerostatic bearing has been designed for supporting a heavy payload. The bearing involves an axial gap on the stator top that provides an upward lift, a bottom gap for counterbalancing the tendency of large lift-off, and a feeding orifice at the bearing inlet that is connected with the gaps by a network of holes or inherences yielding the damping. Notable contributions of the work are proving the concept by numerical simulation through first-principle order-separated modeling and evolving a simple solution strategy. The predicted vertical motion dynamics of the payload reveals that, depending on the target range of the payload weight, alternatives could be free or choked orifice designs.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the double-pad air bearing: (a) front view and (b) top view

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Fig. 2

Variation of the air gap resistance with the top gap

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Fig. 3

Variation of the manifold pressure with the air gap on the stator top for total air gaps of (a) 100 μm and (b) 30 μm

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Fig. 4

Variation of the total mass flow rate with the top air gap

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Fig. 5

Comparison of the approximate analytical solution and the CFD-predicted pressures for the 50 μm top and bottom air gaps gaps for the 0.3 MPa compressor pressure

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Fig. 6

Variation of pressures for the 15 μm top and bottom air gaps with a choked orifice and 0.3 MPa compressor pressure

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Fig. 7

Variation of pressures for the 15 μm top and bottom air gaps with a free-flow orifice and 0.3 MPa compressor pressure

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Fig. 8

Variation of the axial pressure force with the air gap on the stator top for total air gaps of (a) 100 μm and (b) 30 μm

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Fig. 11

Lifting dynamics of a 1000 N total weight

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Fig. 10

Lifting dynamics of the total load for the 15 μm top and bottom air gaps at the final steady state

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Fig. 9

Lifting dynamics of 9 kN total weight for the design with a 100 μm axial gap

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