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Research Papers: Magnetic Storage

Operational Shock Failure Mechanisms in Hard Disk Drives

[+] Author and Article Information
Liping Li

Computer Mechanics Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of California,
Berkeley, CA 94720
e-mail: mellxaa@gmail.com

David B. Bogy

Professor
Computer Mechanics Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of California,
Berkeley, CA 94720

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received August 12, 2013; final manuscript received February 24, 2014; published online April 15, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Frank Talke.

J. Tribol 136(3), 031901 (Apr 15, 2014) (5 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1158; doi: 10.1115/1.4027209 History: Received August 12, 2013; Revised February 24, 2014

The work performance of a hard disk drive (HDD) in mobile devices depends very much on its ability to withstand external disturbances. In this study, a detailed multibody structural model integrated with a complete air bearing model is developed to investigate the disk drive's response during external shocks. The head disk interface (HDI) failure mechanisms when the HDD is subjected to different shock cases are discussed. For a negative shock case in which the disk initially moves towards the head, with long pulse width, the air bearing becomes very stiff before the slider crashes on the disk, and the HDI fails only when the external load overcomes the air bearing force. For other shock cases, the slider contacts the disk due to a negative net bearing force caused by the slider-disk separation. Finally, a stiffer suspension design is proposed to improve the drive shock performance, especially during a positive shock, as under these conditions, the slider contacts the disk primarily due to the stiffness difference of the different drive components.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 6

Slider's crash location

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Fig. 5

Failure mechanism for shock with long pulse width of 2.0 ms: (a) minimum clearance for negative shock 1500 G—no failure; (b) minimum clearance for negative shock 1600 G—failure; (c) air bearing force corresponding to the case in (b); (d) zoom in of minimum clearance in (b); (e) x coordinates for slider's minimum clearance point in (b); and (f) y coordinates for slider's minimum clearance point in (b)

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Fig. 4

Slider's flying parameters for positive shock 400 G: (a) relative pitch; (b) relative roll; (c) x coordinates for slider's minimum clearance point; and (d) y coordinates for slider's minimum clearance point

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Fig. 3

Failure mechanism for shock with short pulse width of 0.5 ms: (a) minimum clearance for positive shock 300 G—no failure; (b) minimum clearance for positive shock 400 G—failure; (c) air bearing force corresponding to the case in (b); and (d) zoom in of minimum clearance in (b)

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Fig. 2

Minimum clearance for two different shock cases with pulse widths of (a) 0.5 ms and (b) 2.0 ms

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Fig. 10

Critical shock dependence on pulse width for three flexure designs

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Fig. 7

The flexure component on the suspension location

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Fig. 8

Critical shocks of disk model and full model for positive shock

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Fig. 9

Critical shocks of the disk model and full model for negative shock

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