0
Technical Brief

Nanoparticles-Laden Gas Film in Aerostatic Thrust Bearing

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhiru Yang

Key Laboratory of Education,
Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System, School of Mechanical Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China

Dongfeng Diao

Key Laboratory of Education,
Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China;
Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE),
Shenzhen University,
Shenzhen 518060, China
e-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn

Xue Fan

Key Laboratory of Education,
Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China
e-mail: fanx@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Hongyan Fan

Key Laboratory of Education,
Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received August 15, 2013; final manuscript received January 7, 2014; published online February 24, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Prof. C. Fred Higgs III.

J. Tribol 136(3), 034501 (Feb 24, 2014) (5 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1163; doi: 10.1115/1.4026503 History: Received August 15, 2013; Revised January 07, 2014

Nanoparticles-laden gas film (NLGF) was formed by adding SiO2 nanoparticles with volume fraction in the range of 0.014–0.330% and size of 30 nm into the air gas film in a thrust bearing. An effective viscosity of the gas-solid two phase lubrication media was introduced. The pressure distribution in NLGF and the load capacity of the thrust bearing were calculated by using the gas-solid two phase flow model with the effective viscosity under the film thicknesses range of 15–60 μm condition. The results showed that the NLGF can increase the load capacity when the film thickness is larger than 30 μm. The mechanism of the enhancement effect of load capacity was attributed to the increase of the effective viscosity of the NLGF from the pure air film, and the novel lubrication media of the NLGF can be expected for the bearing industry application.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Rao, T. V. V. L. N., Sufian, S., and Mohamed, N. M., 2013, “Analysis of Nanoparticle Additive Couple Stress Fluids in Three-layered Journal Bearing,” J. Phys.: Conf. Ser., 431, p. 012023. [CrossRef]
Li, W. M. L., Wu, Y. X., Wang, X. B., and Liu, W. M., 2012, “Tribological Study of Boron-Containing Soybean Lecithin as Environmentally Friendly Lubricant Additive in Synthetic Base Fluids,” Tribol. Lett., 47(3), pp. 381–388. [CrossRef]
Rapoport, L., Fleischer, N., and Tenne, R., 2003, “Fullerene-Like WS2 Nanoparticles: Superior Lubricants for Harsh Conditions,” Adv. Mater., 15(7–8), pp. 651–655. [CrossRef]
Liu, R. D., Wei.X. C., Tao, D. H., and Zhao, Y., 2010, “Study of Preparation and Tribological Properties of Rare Earth Nanoparticles in Lubricating Oil,” Tribol. Int., 43(5–6), pp. 1082–1086. [CrossRef]
Hsin, Y. L., Chu, H. Y., Jeng, Y. R., Huang, Y. H., Wang, M. H., and Chang, C. K., 2011, “In situ De-Agglomeration and Surface Functionalization of Detonation Nanodiamond, With the Polymer Used as an Additive in Lubricant Oil,” J. Mater. Chem., 21(35), pp. 13213–13222. [CrossRef]
Lin, J. S., Wang, L. W., and Chen, G. H., 2011, “Modification of Graphene Platelets and Their Tribological Properties as a Lubricant Additive,” Tribol. Lett., 41(1), pp. 209–215. [CrossRef]
Lee, K., Hwang, Y., Cheong, S., Choi, Y., Kwon, L., Lee, J., and Kim, S. H., 2009, “Understanding the Role of Nanoparticles in Nano-Oil Lubrication,” Tribol. Lett., 35(2), pp. 127–131. [CrossRef]
Yang, Z. R., Diao, D. F., Fan, X., and Fan, H. Y., “Experimental Study on Load Capacity of Nanoparticles-laden Gas Film in Thrust Bearing,” Ind. Lubr. Tribol. (accepted).
Diao, D. F., Wang, C., and Fan, X., 2013, “Frictional Behavior of Nanostructured Carbon Films,” Friction, 1(1), pp. 63–71. [CrossRef]
Powell, J. W., 1970, Design of Aerostatic Bearings, Machinery Publishing, Brighton, UK.
Goodwin, J. W., 2004, Colloids and Interfaces With Surfactants and Polymers—An Introduction, Wiley, New York.
Manninen, M., Taivassalo, V., and Kallio, S., 1996, On the Mixture Model for Multiphase Flow, VTT Publications, Espoo, Finland.
Yang, Z. R., Diao, D. F., and Yang, L., 2013, “Numerical Analysis on Nanoparticles-Laden Gas Film Thrust Bearing,” Chin. J. Mech. Eng., 26(4), pp. 675–679. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

The experimental apparatus: (a) photo of the whole apparatus and (b) schematic sketch of the working parts

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Film thickness variations with time during the experimental process

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Effect of the nanoparticles volume fraction on the load capacity of NLGF with thickness of 45 μm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Effect of the nanoparticles volume fraction on the mixture effective viscosity

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Effect of the nanoparticles volume fraction on the film pressure distribution of NLGF with different film thickness; (a)–(d) pressure distribution of NLGF (h = 15 μm, 30 μm, 45 μm, and 60 μm, respectively)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

The comparison between experimental results and numerical results obtained with effective viscosity

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In