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Technical Brief

Lubrication Performance of Nanoparticles-Laden Gas Film in Thrust Bearing Under Noncontact and Contact Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Hongyan Fan, Zhiru Yang

Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design
and Rotor-Bearing System,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China

Xue Fan

Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design
and Rotor-Bearing System,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China
e-mail: fanx@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Dongfeng Diao

Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design
and Rotor-Bearing System,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China;
Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE),
Shenzhen University,
Shenzhen 518060, China
e-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn

1Corresponding authors.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received September 24, 2013; final manuscript received March 30, 2014; published online May 6, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Robert L. Jackson.

J. Tribol 136(3), 034505 (May 06, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1202; doi: 10.1115/1.4027400 History: Received September 24, 2013; Revised March 30, 2014

The nanoparticles-laden gas film (NLGF), which is formed by adding nanoparticles into the gas film, has a potential to increase the load capacity of the gas film and to protect the surfaces of the bearing from severe contact damage. In order to explore the lubrication performance of NLGF, the load capacity in the noncontact state and the friction coefficient in the contact state were studied experimentally by a novel NLGF thrust bearing apparatus. The effects of nanoparticles concentration on the load capacity and the friction coefficient were investigated, respectively. The lubrication performance of NLGF in a 200 start-stop cyclic test was evaluated. The contact surfaces were analyzed by the surface profilometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that NLGF had the enhancement of the load capacity in the noncontact state and possessed the properties of friction reduction and surface protection in the contact state. An optimal nanoparticles concentration of 60 g/m3 was found, making NLGF have a relative high load capacity in the noncontact state and the lowest friction coefficient in the contact state. With the optimal concentration, the friction coefficient with NLGF kept a low value during the 200 start-stop cyclic test. Then the friction reduction mechanism of NLGF was discussed, and it was inferred that the surface of the disk was covered with a protective film formed by nanoparticles, leading to a lower shear force. This study opens new perspectives of adding nanoparticles into gas bearings to improve the lubrication performance.

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Figures

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Fig. 5

Load capacity and friction coefficient with different nanoparticles concentrations

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Fig. 4

Friction coefficient curves with pure gas film lubrication and NLGF lubrication in the contact state (load: 40 N; speed: 100 rpm)

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Fig. 3

Variation curves of the film thickness and the friction coefficient during the friction coefficient test (load: 40 N; speed: 100 rpm; nanoparticles concentration: 32 g/m3)

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Fig. 2

Variation curve of the film thickness during the load capacity test (nanoparticles concentration: 32 g/m3)

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Fig. 1

Photograph and schematic diagram of the nanoparticles-laden gas film thrust bearing apparatus

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Fig. 6

Ra with different nanoparticles concentrations

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Fig. 7

Variation of the friction coefficient in the start-stop cyclic test

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Fig. 8

Analysis results of the worn surfaces on the disks. (a) and (b): SEM micrographs of the worn surfaces under pure gas film lubrication and NLGF lubrication (nanoparticles concentration: 58 g/m3), respectively. (c) and (d): EDS spectra of the region I and II, respectively.

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