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Research Papers: Contact Mechanics

Tangential Contact Stiffness of Rough Cylindrical Faying Surfaces Based on the Fractal Theory

[+] Author and Article Information
Junping Shi

Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Xi'an University of Technology,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710048, China
State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: shijp@xaut.edu.cn

Xiaoshan Cao

Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Xi'an University of Technology,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710048, China
State Key Laboratory for Strength and
Vibration of Mechanical Structures,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China

Hong Zhu

Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Xi'an University of Technology,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710048, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received June 5, 2013; final manuscript received July 10, 2014; published online August 8, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Robert L. Jackson.

J. Tribol 136(4), 041401 (Aug 08, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1117; doi: 10.1115/1.4028042 History: Received June 05, 2013; Revised July 10, 2014

The tangential contact stiffness of cylindrical asperities is investigated using macro- and micro-mechanisms in this study. A microanalysis model is developed and the tangential contact stiffness of elliptically parabolic asperities on the contact surface is determined. The shape influence coefficient of the cylindrical contact is defined, and its rationality is evaluated. The influence of asperity distribution on the rough surface is determined, and the tangential contact stiffness macroanalysis model is constructed based on fractal theory. The mathematical expression to determine the tangential contact stiffness of the macroscopically cylindrical contact is generated, and the effects of influential factors on tangential contact stiffness are explicitly evaluated. Numerical results show that the tangential contact stiffness of asperities is determined by several factors, such as material properties, applied loads, fractal dimension, and surface shape.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Model of contact between two elliptic parabolic bodies

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Fig. 2

Macrocontact model of the cylinders

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Fig. 3

Relationship between λ and R1

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Fig. 4

Relationship between λ and normal load W

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Fig. 5

Microtangential contact stiffness k plotted as a function of tangential force T

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Fig. 6

Microtangential contact stiffness k plotted as a function of normal force P

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Fig. 7

Normalized tangential contact stiffness K′ variation with normalized normal load W′ given different fractal dimensions D

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Fig. 8

Variation in tangential contact stiffness K′ with changes in fractal dimension D

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Fig. 9

Variation in tangential contact stiffness K′ with changes in parameter h

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Fig. 10

Variation in tangential contact stiffness K′ with the changes in friction coefficient μ

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Fig. 11

Variation in K′ with the changes in parameter η

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Fig. 12

Variation in K′ with changes in parameter φ

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