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Research Papers: Contact Mechanics

Predicting the Permanent Deformation After the Impact of a Rod With a Flat Surface

[+] Author and Article Information
Hamid Ghaednia

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Auburn University,
Auburn, AL 36849
e-mail: hamid.ghaednia@auburn.edu

Dan B. Marghitu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Auburn University,
Auburn, AL 36849
e-mail: marghitu@auburn.edu

Robert L. Jackson

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Auburn University,
Auburn, AL 36849
e-mail: jacksr7@auburn.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received December 12, 2013; final manuscript received September 24, 2014; published online October 23, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Zhong Min Jin.

J. Tribol 137(1), 011403 (Oct 23, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: TRIB-13-1249; doi: 10.1115/1.4028709 History: Received December 12, 2013; Revised September 24, 2014

In this study, a new expression for the permanent deformation after the impact of a rod with a flat surface is given. Both flat and the surface have been considered elastoplastic. The contact has been considered frictionless and has been divided into three phases, the elastic, the elastoplastic, and the unloading phase. For the normal impact force in the loading phase, we considered a nonlinear expression that satisfies the effect of deformation on both objects by using a finite element model. For the unloading phase, the contact force has been considered to follow the Hertz theory. The simulation and experimental results were conducted for different initial impact velocities of the rod. Permanent deformation after the impact and the motion of the rod has been measured accurately in the experiments. Based on the simulation and experimental results an expression for the permanent deformation has been developed. Finally, the model has been verified and compared with previous contact models in terms of the coefficient of restitution.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Sketch of the experimental setup

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Fig. 2

(a) Original image from the tip of the rod. (b) Processed image of the tip of the rod.

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Fig. 3

(a) Gray value distribution for all of the frames. (b) Gray value distribution for the critical frame.

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Fig. 4

Processed image with the tracked contact point

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Fig. 5

Position of the contact point before and after the impact; the dots show the position for every 40 frames

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Fig. 6

(a) 3D scan of the profile after the impact. (b) The cross section of the profile after the impact.

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Fig. 7

(a) FEA modeling with fine mesh around the contact point and (b) stress distribution of the FEA model

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Fig. 8

ANSYS results for contact force, red dots, and Eq. (6) results, continuous line

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Fig. 9

Logarithmic scale plot of permanent deformation, δr, versus maximum indentation, δm, for different models

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Fig. 10

Force versus indentation depth for the maximum experimented drop height

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Fig. 11

Permanent deformation, δr, for different models

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Fig. 12

Kinematic coefficient of restitution for different models

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Fig. 13

Permanent deformation, δr, for updated JG and KE models

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Fig. 14

Kinematic coefficient of restitution for updated JG and KE models

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