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Research Papers: Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Analysis of Pure Squeeze Motion on an Elastic Coating/Elastic Substrate System

[+] Author and Article Information
Li-Ming Chu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology,
Tainan City 71005, Taiwan

Chi-Chen Yu, Qie-Da Chen

Department of Materials Science
and Engineering,
National Cheng Kung University,
No. 1 University Road,
Tainan City 71001, Taiwan

Wang-Long Li

Department of Materials Science
and Engineering,
National Cheng Kung University,
No. 1 University Road,
Tainan City 71001, Taiwan
e-mail: wlli@mail.ncku.edu.tw

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received June 2, 2014; final manuscript received October 22, 2014; published online November 12, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Zhong Min Jin.

J. Tribol 137(1), 011503 (Jan 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: TRIB-14-1123; doi: 10.1115/1.4028916 History: Received June 02, 2014; Revised October 22, 2014; Online November 12, 2014

A rigid sphere approaching a lubricated flat surface with a layer of elastic coating on the elastic substrate is explored under constant load conditions. The transient pressure profiles, film shapes, elastic deformation, von Mises stress (σvon) during the pure squeeze process under various operating conditions in the elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime are discussed. The simulation results reveal that the greater the Young's modulus of coating is, the greater the pressure distribution is, the smaller the contact area is, and the greater the maximum stress (σvon) value is. As the Young’s modulus of coating decreases, the central elastic deformation at the surface (Z = 0) increases and the deformation at the interface of coating/substrate (Z = −1) decreases. For hard coating cases, the maximum central pressure increases to an asymptotic value and minimum film thickness decreases to an asymptotic value as the coating thickness increases. For soft coating cases, this phenomenon reverses. A thicker and stiffer coating leads to a higher maximum stress. At the deformation recovery stage, the positions of the maximum stress would begin to offset downwards and closer to the coating/substrate interface. Moreover, the position of maximum stress varies from the coating to the subsurface as the Young’s modulus of coating increases. The EHL with stress analysis can prevent the chance of fracture in coating or substrate. These characteristics are important for the lubrication design of mechanical elements with coatings.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Geometry of EHL of circular contacts under pure squeeze motion

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Fig. 2

1D meshing and geometry size

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Fig. 3

2D meshing and geometry size

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Fig. 4

Central pressure and film thickness versus time using the proposed model with various model geometry sizes

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Fig. 5

Central pressure and film thickness versus time using various mesh sizes

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Fig. 6

Comparison of results obtained by Chu et al. [22] and those using the present method

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Fig. 7

Pressure distribution versus time using various Ec

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Fig. 8

Film thickness distribution versus time using various Ec

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Fig. 9

Central pressure and film thickness versus time with various Ec

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Fig. 10

Comparison of surface and interface deflection (r  = 0) with various Ec

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Fig. 11

(a) Maximum central pressure versus Tc with various Ec and (b) minimum film thickness versus Tc with various Ec

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Fig. 12

Central pressure and film thickness versus time with various loads with the same coating (Ec = 120.1 GPa, Tc=1.0)

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Fig. 13

Central velocity versus central film thickness with various loads

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Fig. 14

von Mises distributions versus time with different Ec

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Fig. 15

The maximum von Mises stress versus Ec with various coatings during the squeeze process

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