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Research Papers: Hydrodynamic Lubrication

Static Characteristics of Aerostatic Thrust Bearings With Multiple Porous Inlet Ports

[+] Author and Article Information
Takako Hosokawa

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tokyo University of Science,
6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku,
Tokyo 125-8585, Japan
e-mail: 4513646@ed.tus.ac.jp

Kei Somaya

Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tokyo University of Science,
6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku,
Tokyo 125-8585, Japan
e-mail: somaya@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp

Masaaki Miyatake

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tokyo University of Science,
6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku,
Tokyo 125-8585, Japan
e-mail: m-miyatake@rs.tus.ac.jp

Shigeka Yoshimoto

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tokyo University of Science,
6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku,
Tokyo 125-8585, Japan
e-mail: yosimoto@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received June 9, 2014; final manuscript received October 22, 2014; published online December 12, 2014. Editor: Michael Khonsari.

J. Tribol 137(2), 021702 (Apr 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: TRIB-14-1129; doi: 10.1115/1.4028999 History: Received June 09, 2014; Revised October 22, 2014; Online December 12, 2014

Aerostatic porous bearings have been applied successfully to various precision devices, such as precision machine tools and precision measuring equipment, to achieve higher accuracy of motion. Recently, large aerostatic porous thrust bearings have been used as essential components in a lithography machine for large liquid crystal display (LCD) glasses. Conventional aerostatic porous bearings are made of porous material that covers the whole of the bearing surface area, requiring a large piece of such material for large bearings. However, making large pieces of porous material requires the use of a large electric furnace, which is a very expensive part of the bearing's manufacturing cost. To overcome this problem, this paper proposes an aerostatic thrust bearing with multiple porous inlet ports. The proposed bearing has a number of small porous inlet ports on the bearing surface, thereby avoiding the need for large electric furnaces. The static characteristics of the proposed bearings are investigated numerically and experimentally. The results show that the proposed aerostatic thrust bearing is potentially very useful for the manufacture of large aerostatic thrust bearings, where it would have advantages over conventional aerostatic porous thrust bearings.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Conventional aerostatic porous thrust bearing and proposed aerostatic thrust bearing with multiple porous inlet ports. (a) Conventional aerostatic porous thrust bearing and (b) proposed aerostatic thrust bearing with porous inlet ports.

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Fig. 2

Aerostatic thrust bearings with multiple porous inlet ports treated in this paper, coordinate systems, and symbols

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Fig. 3

Bearing models used in numerical calculations: (γ1 = Dc/D01 = 0.875, γ2 = (Dc − D02/2)/D01 = 0.725). (a) eight-inlet ports Dp0 = 6 mm, β = 0.527, (b) six-inlet ports Dp0 = 8 mm, β = 0.527, and (c) four-inlet ports Dp0 = 12 mm, β = 0.478.

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Fig. 4

Grid formation using the mesh superposition method for numerical calculation

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Fig. 5

Pressure distributions at a bearing clearance of 0.5 μm. (a) eight-port bearing, (b) six-port bearing, and (c) four-port bearing.

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Fig. 6

Effect of the number of porous inlet ports on the load capacity and the static stiffness

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Fig. 7

Effect of the position of porous inlet ports on the load capacity and the static stiffness

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Fig. 8

Effect of the feed-hole diameter of porous inlet ports on the load capacity and the static stiffness

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Fig. 9

Comparison of the load capacity and the static stiffness between conventional and proposed bearings

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Fig. 10

Test bearings used in experiments

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Fig. 11

Experimental apparatus

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Fig. 12

Determination of permeability by measured volume flow rates of the test bearings

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Fig. 13

Experimental and numerical results of the volume flow rates of the test bearings

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Fig. 14

Experimental and numerical results of the load capacities of the test bearings

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Fig. 15

Experimental and numerical results of the static stiffness of the test bearings

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Fig. 16

Measurement method of the surface flatness δf of the test bearings

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