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Research Papers: Applications

Rolling-Element Bearing Heat Transfer—Part III: Experimental Validation

[+] Author and Article Information
William M. Hannon

The Timken Company,
North Canton, OH 44720-5450
e-mail: william.hannon@timken.com

Todd A. Barr

The Timken Company,
North Canton, OH 44720-5450
e-mail: todd.barr@timken.com

Shawn T. Froelich

The Timken Company,
North Canton, OH 44720-5450
e-mail: shawn.froelich@timken.com

The Timken Bearing Syber Analysis Program calculated torque. This program calculates global and local deflection and bearing life, as well as the local rolling element contact stress, film thickness, torque, and power losses. The output of Syber is used in this work as an input to the heat transfer model.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received July 29, 2014; final manuscript received January 12, 2015; published online March 25, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Mihai Arghir.

J. Tribol 137(3), 031104 (Jul 01, 2015) (13 pages) Paper No: TRIB-14-1190; doi: 10.1115/1.4029734 History: Received July 29, 2014; Revised January 12, 2015; Online March 25, 2015

This paper concludes a series of papers outlining a new rolling-element bearing heat transfer model. Part I provided the model framework, Part II presented the partial differential equation (PDE) solutions, and Part III, this paper, presents full-scale test results for ball, cylindrical, spherical, and tapered rolling-element bearings. The results validate the heat partitioning equation and the predicted solid temperatures for circulating oil lubrication. In addition, sump lubrication was studied using an acrylic assembly. The results quantify what fraction of the bearing periphery is cooled by oil, as well as the flow of oil through a bearing. Finally, substantiation of the modeling assumptions is discussed.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Test rig schematic

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Fig. 3

Tapered bearing space filling design for load and speed

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Fig. 4

Lubricant distribution by lubricant method

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Fig. 5

Sump flow acrylic housing

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Fig. 6

Ball bearing oil outlet temperature—predicted versus experiment

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Fig. 7

Ball bearing oil outlet percent error—predicted versus experiment

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Fig. 8

Cylindrical bearing oil outlet temperature—predicted versus Experiment

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Fig. 9

Cylindrical bearing oil outlet percent error—predicted versus experiment

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Fig. 10

Spherical bearing oil outlet temperature—predicted versus experiment

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Fig. 11

Spherical bearing oil outlet percent error—predicted versus experiment

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Fig. 12

Tapered bearing oil outlet temperature—predicted versus experiment

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Fig. 13

Tapered bearing oil outlet percent error—predicted versus experiment

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Fig. 14

Bearing raceway radial boundary condition

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Fig. 15

Predicted results for the first row of the first spherical bearing (refer Fig. 2). Predicted outer raceway temperature: (a) at r = R3 and (b) in the load zone. (c) Predicted inner raceway temperature at r = R2 and (d) predicted inner raceway temperature.

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Fig. 16

Predicted results for the first row of the third spherical bearing (refer Fig. 2). Predicted outer raceway temperature: (a) at r = R3 and (b) in the load zone. (c) Predicted inner raceway temperature at r = R2 and (d) predicted inner raceway temperature.

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Fig. 17

Thermal model—actual by predicted results

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Fig. 18

Bearing convection-coefficient

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Fig. 19

Fluorescent lubricant illumination within the bearing, under rotation. (Rotation is bottom-up or counterclockwise when viewed from the left end of the shaft.) (a) 0 rpm, (b) 100 rpm, (c) 250 rpm, and (d) 500 rpm.

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Fig. 20

High-speed photograph of sump-driven flow

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Fig. 21

Oil height along the bearing periphery. Static percent fill: (a) 12.5%–160 cSt, (b) 25%–160 cSt, and (c) 50%–160 cSt.

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Fig. 22

Dye injection into sump oil at 250 rpm. Images (a)–(d) were obtained when the static-assembly sump was 25% full of 160 cSt oil. (a) t = 0 s, (b) t = 2 s, (c) t = 4 s, and (a) t = 6 s. (a) Images (e)–(h) were obtained when the static-assembly sump was 12.5% full of 10 cSt oil. (e) t = 0 s, (f) t = 2 s, (g) t = 4 s, and (h) t = 6 s.

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Fig. 23

Acrylic housing with grease; rotation speed of 250 rpm

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Fig. 24

In-rotation cylindrical bearing percent fill

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