0
Research Papers: Friction & Wear

An Investigation on Transition Between Mild and Severe Wear in Mg–5Al–0.8Zn Magnesium Alloy Using Recrystallization Kinetics Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
C. Liang, T. F. Su, Y. B. Wang, X. Han, M. L. Yin

Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials,
Ministry of Education,
Department of Materials Science and Engineering,
Jilin University,
Changchun 130025, China

J. An

Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials,
Ministry of Education,
Department of Materials Science and Engineering,
Jilin University,
Changchun 130025, China
e-mail: anjian@jlu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received November 13, 2014; final manuscript received February 15, 2015; published online March 31, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Satish V. Kailas.

J. Tribol 137(3), 031602 (Jul 01, 2015) (12 pages) Paper No: TRIB-14-1277; doi: 10.1115/1.4029846 History: Received November 13, 2014; Revised February 15, 2015; Online March 31, 2015

Wear behavior of Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy was studied using a pin-on-disk type wear apparatus within a load range of 20–380 N and a sliding speed range of 0.1–4.0 m/s. Analyzes on morphology and chemical composition of worn surfaces were undertaken using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) for determination type of wear mechanism. Investigations on microstructure, plastic strain, and hardness in subsurfaces were carried out using optical microscope and hardness tester for understanding changes in the microstructure and hardness before and after mild to severe wear transition. The subsurface microstructure beneath the worn surface was subjected to a large plastic strain, and experienced strain hardening, dynamic recrystallization (DRX), and melting successively with increasing load or sliding speed. The transition between mild and severe wear was controlled by microstructure transformation from a strain-hardened into a thermal soften DRX microstructure in subsurface. A contact surface DRX temperature criterion is proposed for prediction of transition between mild and severe wear in Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy. The mild to severe wear transition loads were predicted under various sliding speeds using DRX kinetics. The validity of the proposed method for prediction of transition between mild and severe wear is also verified in AZ31 and AZ61 alloys.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Mordike, B. L., and Ebert, T., 2001, “Magnesium Properties-Applications-Potential,” Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 302(1), pp. 37–45. [CrossRef]
Chen, H., and Alpas, A. T., 2000, “Sliding Wear Map for the Magnesium Alloy Mg–9Al–0.9Zn (AZ91),” Wear, 246(1–2), pp. 106–116. [CrossRef]
El-Morsy, A. W., 2008, “Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Hot Deformed Magnesium AZ61 Alloy as Influenced by the Sliding Conditions,” Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 473(1–2), pp. 330–335. [CrossRef]
Taltavull, C., Torres, B., Lopez, A. J., and Rams, J., 2013, “Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of AM60B Magnesium Alloy,” Wear, 301(1–2), pp. 615–625. [CrossRef]
Selvan, S. A., and Ramanathan, S., 2010, “A Comparative Study of the Wear Behavior of As-Cast and Hot Extruded ZE41A Magnesium Alloy,” J. Alloys Compd., 502(2), pp. 495–502. [CrossRef]
Wang, S. Q., Yang, Z. R., Zhao, Y. T., and Wei, M. X., 2010, “Sliding Wear Characteristics of AZ91D Alloy at Ambient Temperatures of 25–200 °C,” Tribol. Lett., 38(1), pp. 39–45. [CrossRef]
Kumar Mondal, A., Chandra Rao, B. S. S., and Kumar, S., 2007, “Wear Behaviour of AE42  + 20% Saffi Mg-MMC,” Tribol. Int., 40(2), pp. 290–296. [CrossRef]
Arora, H. S., Singh, H., and Dhindaw, B. K., 2013, “Wear Behaviour of a Mg Alloy Subjected to Friction Stir Processing,” Wear, 303(1–2), pp. 65–77. [CrossRef]
Zhang, J., and Alpas, A. T., 1997, “Transition Between Mild and Severe Wear in Aluminum Alloys,” Acta Mater., 45(2), pp. 513–518. [CrossRef]
Liang, C., Li, C., Lv, X. X., and An, J., 2014, “Correlation Between Friction-Induced Microstructural Evolution, Strain Hardening in Subsurface and Tribological Properties of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy,” Wear, 312(1–2), pp. 29–39. [CrossRef]
Somekawa, H., Meada, S., Hirayama, T., Mitsuoka, T., Inoue, T., and Mukai, T., 2013, “Microstructural Evolution During Dry Wear Test in Magnesium and Mg–Y Alloy,” Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 561(1), pp. 371–377. [CrossRef]
Yao, B., Han, Z., and Lu, K., 2012, “Correlation Between Wear Resistance and Subsurface Recrystallization Structure in Copper,” Wear, 294–295, pp. 438–445. [CrossRef]
Moore, M. A., and Douthwaite, R. M., 1976, “Plastic Deformation Below Worn Surface,” Metall. Trans., 7(12), pp. 1833–1839. [CrossRef]
Venkataraman, B., and Sundararajan, G., 1996, “The Sliding Behaviour of Al–SiC Particulate Composites II. The Characterization of Subsurface Deformation and Correlation With Wear Behaviour,” Acta Mater., 44(2), pp. 461–473. [CrossRef]
Archard, J. F., 1953, “Contact and Rubbing of Flat Surfaces,” J. Appl. Phys., 24(8), pp. 981–988. [CrossRef]
Humphreys, F. J., and Hatherly, M., 2005, Recrystallization and Related Annealing Phenomena, Pergamon, Oxford, UK.
Yang, X., Okabe, Y., Miura, H., and Sakai, T., 2012, “Effect of Pass Strain and Temperature on Recrystallisation in Magnesium Alloy AZ31 After Interrupted Cold Deformation,” J. Mater. Sci., 47(6), pp. 2823–2830. [CrossRef]
Zhou, H. T., Zeng, X. Q., Liu, L. L., Dong, J., Wang, Q. D., Ding, W. J., and Zhu, Y. P., 2004, “Microstructural Evolution of AZ61 Magnesium Alloy During Hot Deformation,” Mater. Sci. Technol., 20(11), pp. 1397–1402. [CrossRef]
Lim, S. C., and Ashby, M. F., 1987, “Wear-Mechanism Maps,” Acta Metall., 35(1), pp. 1–24. [CrossRef]
Mwembela, A., Konopleva, E. B., and McQueen, H. J., 1997, “Microstructural Development in Mg Alloy AZ31 During Hot Working,” Scr. Mater., 37(11), pp. 1789–1795. [CrossRef]
Wu, H. Y., Yang, J. C., Zhu, F. J., and Liu, H. C., 2012, “Hot Deformation Characteristics of As-Cast and Homogenized AZ61 Mg Alloys,” Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 550, pp. 273–278. [CrossRef]
Yoshioka, R., Matsuoka, T., Sakaguchi, K., Mukai, T., and Murata, A., 2003, “Friction and Wear Properties of Solution-Treated and Aging-Treated Mg–Al–Zn Alloys,” J. Soc. Mater. Sci., Jpn., 52(6), pp. 702–708. [CrossRef]
Venkataraman, B., and Sundararajan, G., 2000, “Correlation Between the Characteristics of the Mechanically Mixed Layer and Wear Behaviour of Aluminum, A-7075 Alloy and Al-MMCs,” Wear, 245(1–2), pp. 22–38. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

XRD pattern of Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Micrographs of microstructure for Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy: (a) showing the grain size of α-Mg solid solution phase and distribution of intermetallic particles and (b) showing the details of the microstructure

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

DTA thermogram of Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

COF (a) and wear-rate (b) as a function of applied load for tests conducted at different speeds

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

SEM micrographs of worn surfaces of Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy under different sliding conditions: (a) 0.1 m/s and 20 N, (b) 0.785m/s and 20 N, (c) 0.5 m/s and 200 N, (d) center location, 0.785 m/s and 200 N, (e) extruded edge, 0.785 m/s and 200 N, and (f) 1.5 m/s and 180 N

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

EDS spectra of worn surfaces of Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy under different sliding conditions: (a) 0.1 m/s and 20 N and (b) 0.785 m/s and 200 N

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Wear mechanism map for Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Measured and calculated transition loads for Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy at different sliding speeds

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Cross-sectional microstructures of Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy after sliding at different loads under sliding speed of 0.785 m/s: (a) 20 N, (b) 80 N, (c) 140 N, (d) 140 N, showing the deformed region, (e) 200 N, (f) 200 N, showing the DRX region, (g) 320 N, and (h) 320 N, showing the solidified region and DRX region

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Micrographs of microstructures at a depth of about 15 μm in subsurfaces of worn specimens tested at: (a) 80 N, (b) 80 N, showing high density of twins, (c) 120 N, (d) 120 N, showing refined DRX α-Mg grains, (e) 140 N, showing refined DRX α-Mg grains and Mg17Al12 phase particles, (f) 160 N, showing refined DRX α-Mg grains and less Mg17Al12 phase particles, and (g) 180 N, showing solidified microstructure

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Variations in equivalent plastic strains with depth from surface for Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy tested at 20 N, 80 N, and 140 N under 0.785 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Variation in hardness with depth from surface at different load ranges: (a) 20–140 N and (b) 140–260 N

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Hardness of worn surfaces of Mg–5Al–0.8Zn alloy subjected to different loads and sliding speeds

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Measured and calculated transition loads for as-cast AZ31 and hot deformed AZ61 alloys at different sliding speeds

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In