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Research Papers: Hydrodynamic Lubrication

Effects of Grooving in a Hydrostatic Circular Step Thrust Bearing With Porous Facing

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Mahbubur Razzaque

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Bangladesh University of Engineering
and Technology,
Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh
e-mail: mmrazzaque@me.buet.ac.bd

M. Zakir Hossain

Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Bangladesh University of Engineering
and Technology,
Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh;
Complex Flow Systems Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical
and Materials Engineering,
University of Western Ontario,
London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
e-mail: mhossai8@alumni.uwo.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received December 17, 2014; final manuscript received February 16, 2015; published online April 6, 2015. Assoc. Editor: George K. Nikas.

J. Tribol 137(3), 031703 (Jul 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: TRIB-14-1309; doi: 10.1115/1.4029897 History: Received December 17, 2014; Revised February 16, 2015; Online April 06, 2015

Effects of grooving in a porous faced hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing are investigated using a mathematical model based on the narrow groove theory (NGT). It is shown that enhancement of load capacity by grooving the step is possible at moderate level of permeability of the porous facing. Load capacity drops sharply with the increase of porous facing thickness. However, this drop in load capacity occurs mostly within a small thickness of the porous facing. Considering the coupled effects of permeability and inertia, it is recommended that the dimensionless step location should be 0.5–0.8 and the dimensionless step height should be less than five to take advantage of grooving. The groove geometric parameters such as groove inclination angle, fraction of grooved area and groove depth corresponding to the maximum load capacity are found to be the same for both with and without porous facing. However, with porous facing, the sensitivity of the load capacity on the groove parameters reduces. At high level of permeability, the effects of grooves may become insignificant because of high seepage flow through the porous facing.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) Model of the porous hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing and (b) the top view of the grooved circular step

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Fig. 2

Control volume in the fluid film

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Fig. 3

Effect of grooving and permeability on the pressure distribution in different types of hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing. (α = 0.1, Δ = 1.2, β = 135 deg, ε = 5, Ri = 0.5, ϕΗ/hr3= 0.04 and S = 3).

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Fig. 4

Effect of permeability and grooving on flow rate in a hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing

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Fig. 5

Effect of the porous facing thickness on the load capacity of a hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing. Solid lines: α = 0.1 and dashed lines: α = 0.5.

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Fig. 6

Effect of step location and step height on the load capacity of a porous hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing

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Fig. 7

Effect of permeability and inertia on load capacity of a porous hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing without groove. Solid lines are for S = 2 and the dashed lines are for S = 3.

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Fig. 8

Effect of permeability on load capacity of a porous hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing with grooves on the step (for S = 2)

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Fig. 9

Effect of permeability on load capacity of a porous hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing with grooves on the step (for S = 3)

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Fig. 10

The step location corresponding to the change in the behavior of load capacity with a change in permeability, Ri′ versus inertia parameter S

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Fig. 11

Effect of permeability and inertia on pumping power in a porous hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing with the step grooved. Solid lines are for S = 2 and the dashed lines are for S = 3.

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Fig. 12

Effect of the fraction of grooved area and permeability on load capacity of a porous hydrostatic circular step thrust bearing with grooves on the step. Solid lines are for ϕ = 1 × 10−10 m2 and the dashed lines are for ϕ = 0.

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