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Research Papers: Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

Simulation of Plasto-Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication in Line Contacts of Infinite and Finite Length

[+] Author and Article Information
Tao He, Dong Zhu

School of Aeronautics and Astronautics,
Sichuan University,
Chengdu 610065, China

Jiaxu Wang

School of Aeronautics and Astronautics,
Sichuan University,
Chengdu 610065, China
State Key Laboratory of
Mechanical Transmissions,
Chongqing University,
Chongqing 400044, China

Zhanjiang Wang

State Key Laboratory of
Mechanical Transmissions,
Chongqing University,
Chongqing 400044, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received December 26, 2014; final manuscript received May 16, 2015; published online July 7, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Xiaolan Ai.

J. Tribol 137(4), 041505 (Oct 01, 2015) (12 pages) Paper No: TRIB-14-1316; doi: 10.1115/1.4030690 History: Received December 26, 2014; Revised May 16, 2015; Online July 07, 2015

Line contact is common in many machine components, such as various gears, roller and needle bearings, and cams and followers. Traditionally, line contact is modeled as a two-dimensional (2D) problem when the surfaces are assumed to be smooth or treated stochastically. In reality, however, surface roughness is usually three-dimensional (3D) in nature, so that a 3D model is needed when analyzing contact and lubrication deterministically. Moreover, contact length is often finite, and realistic geometry may possibly include a crowning in the axial direction and round corners or chamfers at two ends. In the present study, plasto-elastohydrodynamic lubrication (PEHL) simulations for line contacts of both infinite and finite length have been conducted, taking into account the effects of surface roughness and possible plastic deformation, with a 3D model that is needed when taking into account the realistic contact geometry and the 3D surface topography. With this newly developed PEHL model, numerical cases are analyzed in order to reveal the PEHL characteristics in different types of line contact.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Geometry of infinitely long line contact and computational domain

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Fig. 2

Geometry of finite line contact and computational domain

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Fig. 3

Comparisons of film thickness and pressure distributions between EHL and PEHL solutions: (a) profiles along the x-direction at Y = 0 and (b) profiles along the y-direction at X = 0

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Fig. 4

Plastic deformation profile

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Fig. 5

Subsurface von Mises stress distributions: (a) EHL solution, (b) PEHL solution, and (c) comparison at the contact center

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Fig. 6

Effect of material hardening property

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Fig. 7

Effect of applied load

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Fig. 8

A ground surface (root mean square (RMS) = 0.3 μm)

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Fig. 9

Mixed PEHL solution in line contact of infinite length: (a) film thickness and pressure profiles along the x-axis, (b) plastic deformation, (c) subsurface von Mises stress, and (d) residual stress

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Fig. 10

Transition from full-film and mixed PEHL down to dry contact as the speed decreases: (a) 100 m/s, λ = 4.57, Wc = 0.0, (b) 20 m/s, λ = 0.83, Wc = 3.58%, (c) 12 m/s, λ = 0.33, Wc = 26.08%, (d) 3.5 m/s, λ = 0.14, Wc = 58.02%, (e) 0.2 m/s, λ = 0.09, Wc = 74.87%, and (f) 0.002 m/s, λ = 0.08, Wc = 79.16%

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Fig. 11

Continuous transition of lubrication condition

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Fig. 12

Comparison of film thickness and pressure profiles between EHL and PEHL solutions: (a) profiles along the x-direction at Y = 0 and (b) profiles along the y-direction at X = 0

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Fig. 13

3D plastic deformation profile

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Fig. 14

Effect of round corner radius

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Fig. 15

Effect of crown radius

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Fig. 16

Effect of applied load

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Fig. 17

Mixed PEHL solution in line contact of finite length: (a) film thickness and pressure profiles along the x-axis, (b) plastic deformation, (c) subsurface von Mises stress, and (d) residual stress

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Fig. 18

Transition from full-film and mixed PEHL down to dry contact as the speed decreases

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Fig. 19

Continuous transition of lubrication condition

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