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Research Papers: Contact Mechanics

Lagrangian Explicit Finite Element Modeling for Spin-Rolling Contact

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiangyun Deng

Section of Railway Engineering,
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences,
Delft University of Technology,
Stevinweg 1,
Delft, CN 2628, The Netherlands
e-mail: X.Deng@tudelft.nl

Zhiwei Qian

Section of Railway Engineering,
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences,
Delft University of Technology,
Stevinweg 1,
Delft, CN 2628, The Netherlands
e-mail: Z.Qian@tudelft.nl

Rolf Dollevoet

Professor
Section of Railway Engineering,
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences,
Delft University of Technology,
Stevinweg 1,
Delft, CN 2628, The Netherlands
e-mail: R.P.B.J.Dollevoet@tudelft.nl

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received October 31, 2014; final manuscript received April 22, 2015; published online July 9, 2015. Assoc. Editor: James R. Barber.

J. Tribol 137(4), 041401 (Oct 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: TRIB-14-1268; doi: 10.1115/1.4030709 History: Received October 31, 2014; Revised April 22, 2015; Online July 09, 2015

Spin in frictional rolling contact can cause significant stress, which is the key to understanding and predicting the wear and fatigue behavior of contact components, such as wheels, rails, and rolling bearings. The lateral creep force arising from spin influences the kinematics of a wheelset and thus of vehicles. The solution that is currently employed in the field of elasticity and continuum statics was developed by Kalker and uses a boundary element method (BEM). In this paper, a new approach based on Lagrangian explicit finite element (FE) analysis is employed. This approach is able to consider arbitrary geometric profiles of rails and wheels, complex material behavior and dynamic effects, and some other factors. The new approach is demonstrated using a three-dimensional (3D) model of a wheel with a coned profile rolling along a quarter cylinder and can be easily adapted to apply to wheels and rails of arbitrary profiles. The 3D FE model is configured with elastic material properties and is used to obtain both normal and tangential solutions. The results are compared with those of the Hertz theory and the Kalker's model. The 3D FE model is then configured with elastoplastic material properties to study the spin-rolling contact with plasticity. The continuum dynamics phenomenon is captured by the FE model, which enhances the ability of the model to mimic reality. This improvement considerably extends the applicability of the FE model. The model can be applied to fatigue and wear analyses at gauge corners or rails as well as to deep groove bearings, where a large geometrical spin is present and plastic deformation may be of importance.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) Spin due to the yaw velocity of the wheel, where ∅⁣ is the yaw angle and (b) spin due to geometric factors, where δ is the contact angle and the wheel is rolling with an angular velocity ω around the axis. The component ωz' is produced as a result of the coned geometry of the wheel; Johnson [1].

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Fig. 2

Generalization of the rail gauge corner

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Fig. 3

FE model: (a) schematic diagram and (b) mesh

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Fig. 4

The distributions of contact pressure (δ = 12.5 deg): (a) along the longitudinal axis (y' = 0) and (b) along the lateral axis (x = 0)

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Fig. 5

Vector graphs of the surface shear stresses for different traction coefficients (δ = 12.5 deg): (a) μ = 0 and (b) μ = 0.3

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Fig. 6

The distributions of the surface shear stress along the longitudinal axis (y' = 0) for μ = 0.3: (a) contact angle δ = 12.5 deg and (b) contact angle δ = 25 deg

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Fig. 7

The stick–slip area distribution and the corresponding microslip for μ = 0 (δ = 12.5 deg): (a) FE solution and (b) Kalker's solution

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Fig. 8

The stick–slip area distribution and the corresponding microslip for μ = 0.3 (δ = 12.5 deg): (a) FE solution and (b) Kalker's solution

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Fig. 9

The distributions of microslip (absolute values) along the longitudinal axis (y' = 0) for μ = 0.3 (δ = 12.5 deg)

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Fig. 10

The von Mises stress distributions for μ = 0.3 (δ = 12.5 deg): (a) along the longitudinal axis (y' = 0) and (b) along the lateral axis (x = 0)

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Fig. 11

The pressure distributions in the contact patch (μ = 0.3 and δ = 12.5 deg): (a) along the longitudinal axis (y' = 0) and (b) along the lateral axis (x = 0)

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Fig. 12

Tangential solutions for δ = 12.5 deg (μ = 0.3): (a) shear stress distribution along the longitudinal axis (y' = 0); (b) shear stress distribution along the lateral axis (x = 0); (c) microslip distribution along the longitudinal axis (y' = 0); and (d) stick–slip area distribution, surface shear stress, and microslip, where the black oval represents the location of the contact patch in the elastic solution for comparison

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Fig. 13

The stick–slip area distribution for δ = 25 deg and μ = 0.3, where the black oval represents the location of the contact patch in the elastic solution for comparison

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Fig. 14

The distributions of pressure and von Mises stress in the contact patch for different traction coefficients (δ = 12.5 deg): (a) along the longitudinal axis (y' = 0) and (b) along the lateral axis (x = 0)

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Fig. 15

Subsurface stress distributions with depth for contact angles of 12.5 deg and 25 deg

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Fig. 16

Stress histories of the critical points under and on the surface: (a) δ = 12.5 deg and (b) δ = 25 deg

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