0
Technical Brief

The Relation Between Thermal Wedge and Thermal Boundary Conditions for the Load-Carrying Capacity of a Rectangular Pad and a Slider With Parallel Gaps

[+] Author and Article Information
Jinlei Cui

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Qingdao Technological University,
Qingdao 266033, China
e-mail: cuijl2001@126.com

Motohiro Kaneta

Faculty of Mechanical Engineering,
Brno University of Technology,
Brno 61669, Czech Republic
e-mail: kaneta@fme.vutbr.cz

Ping Yang

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Qingdao Technological University,
Qingdao 266033, China
e-mail: yp_qingdao@163.com

Peiran Yang

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Qingdao Technological University,
Qingdao 266033, China
e-mail: pryang@public.qd.sd.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received April 14, 2015; final manuscript received August 14, 2015; published online October 20, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Jordan Liu.

J. Tribol 138(2), 024502 (Oct 20, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: TRIB-15-1116; doi: 10.1115/1.4031515 History: Received April 14, 2015; Revised August 14, 2015

In order to understand the load-carrying mechanism of thermal wedge, numerical results for a rectangular pad and a slider with parallel gaps under four types of surface boundary temperature conditions are presented. Two assumptions of rigid-solid and smooth-surface were used to exclude the effects of both thermal deformation and micro-asperity. The relation between thermal wedge and thermal boundary conditions is revealed. The load-carrying mechanism of parallel gaps is explained with the thermal wedge derived not only from the surface temperature difference (STD) as proposed by Cameron but also from the film temperature gradient (FTG) independent of STD. It is also pointed out that in numerical analysis, the very small viscosity–temperature coefficient would result in high oil temperature and therefore, the predicted loading capacity from thermal density wedge would be extremely enlarged.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Variations in w versus ho predicted by four types of thermal solutions for parallel gaps, U = 50 m/s, η0 = 0.1 Pa·s, β = 0.05 K−1, and γ = 0.00065 K−1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Variations in w versus η0 predicted by four types of thermal solutions for a parallel gap, ho = 20 μm, U = 50 m/s, β = 0.05 K−1, and γ = 0.00065 K−1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Pressure profiles on the section of y = 0 predicted by four types of thermal solutions for a parallel gap, ho = 20 μm, U = 50 m/s, η0 = 0.1 Pa·s, β = 0.05 K−1, and γ = 0.00065 K−1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Contours of temperature on the xoz plane predicted by four types of thermal solutions, input data are the same as those for Fig. 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Variations in w versus β predicted by four types of thermal solutions for a parallel gap with γ = 0.00065 K−1 (solid lines) and γ = 0 (dash–dot lines), respectively, for ho = 20 μm, U = 50 m/s, and η0 = 0.1 Pa·s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Temperature profiles on the plane of y = 0 for the running surface predicted by type 2 solutions with γ = 0.00065 K−1 (solid lines) and γ = 0 (dash–dot lines) for β = 0.002, 0.005, 0.01, 0.02, and 0.05 K−1, respectively. Other input data are the same as in Fig. 5.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Variations in w versus U predicted by four types of thermal solutions for a parallel gap with γ = 0.00065 K−1 (solid lines) and γ = 0 (dash–dot lines) for ho = 20 μm, η0 = 0.1 Pa·s, and β = 0.05 K−1

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In