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Research Papers: Micro-Nano Tribology

Numerical and Experimental Tribological Investigations of Diamond Nanoparticles

[+] Author and Article Information
Matthew D. Marko

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Columbia University,
500 West 120th Street,
New York, NY 10027;
Navy Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division,
JB-MDL,
Highway 547,
Lakehurst, NJ 08733
e-mail: matthew.marko@navy.mil

Jonathan P. Kyle, Yuanyuan Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Columbia University,
500 West 120th Street,
New York, NY 10027

Blake Branson

sp3 Nanotech, LLC,
1448 Halsey Way, Suite 110,
Carrollton, TX 75007

Elon J. Terrell

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Columbia University,
500 West 120th Street,
New York, NY 10027;
Sentient Science Corporation,
672 Delaware Avenue,
Buffalo, NY 14209
e-mail: eterrell@sentientscience.com

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received June 9, 2015; final manuscript received October 17, 2015; published online January 8, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Min Zou. This work is in part a work of the U.S. Government. ASME disclaims all interest in the U.S. Government's contributions.

J. Tribol 138(3), 032001 (Jan 08, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: TRIB-15-1192; doi: 10.1115/1.4031912 History: Received June 09, 2015; Revised October 17, 2015

An effort was made to study and characterize the tribological characteristics of diamond nanoparticles as compared to neat mineral oil in the presence of sliding contact typically observed in the standard ASTM D4172 four-ball test. Four-ball tests were conducted with a solution of diamond nanoparticles and mineral oil, both at varying run times and bulk oil temperatures, and a consistent reduction in wear rates was observed. Numerical simulations were performed; it was observed that by enhancing the thermal conductivity of the lubricant, the wear reduction rate was observed to match the diamond nanoparticles solution results remarkably. This effort provides evidence that this additive wear reduction is in part caused by reduced lubricant temperatures due to the enhanced conductivity of the diamond.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Lubricant thermal conductivity (W/m °C) for both neat mineral oil (Eq. (20)) and 0.01% weight concentration of diamond nanoparticles (Eq. (19)), as a function of temperature (°C)

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Fig. 2

Simulation wear scar profiles after 3600 s of sliding contact for neat mineral oil at (a) T = 25 °C, (b) T = 51 °C, and (c) T = 59 °C; and for 0.01% diamond nanoparticles solution at (d) T = 25 °C, (e) T = 51 °C, and (f) T = 59 °C. Color bar represents the wear depth in μm.

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Fig. 3

Experimental [9] and numerical wear (μm3) data as a function of diamond nanoparticle weight concentration. Diamonds represent the average experimental wear, and error bars represent the experimental standard deviation.

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Fig. 4

Experimental and numerical results of wear studies as a function of bulk lubricant oil temperatures ranging from T = 44 °C to 67 °C, for 0.01% diamond nanoparticles solution. Diamonds represent the experimental average wear, while error bars represent the average (thick error bars) and maximum (thin error bars) experimental variation of the wear observed between all six samples (two repeating tests with three ball bearings each).

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Fig. 5

Experimental and numerical results of wear scar diameter (mm) studies as a function of bulk lubricant oil temperatures ranging from T = 44 °C to 67 °C, for 0.01% diamond nanoparticles solution. Diamonds represent the experimental average wear scar diameter, while error bars represent the average (thick error bars) and maximum (thin error bars) experimental variation of the wear scar diameter observed between all six samples (two repeating tests with three ball bearings each).

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Fig. 6

Experimental results of wear studies as a function of bulk lubricant oil temperatures ranging from T = 44 °C to 67 °C, for both neat mineral oil and 0.01% diamond nanoparticles solution. Experimental error bars represent the standard deviation.

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Fig. 7

Experimental and numerical results of wear evolution studies of diamond nanoparticle solution, at a constant bulk lubricant oil temperature of T = 51 °C

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Fig. 8

Wear scar diameter (mm) experimental data and matching simulation results, for 0.01% diamond nanoparticle solution at a bulk lubricant oil temperature of T = 51 °C. Diamonds represent the experimental average wear, while error bars represent the average (thick error bars) and maximum (thin error bars) experimental variation of the wear observed between all six samples (two repeating tests with three ball bearings each).

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