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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

A Study on the Effect of Laser Surface Texturing on Friction and Wear Behavior of Graphite Cast Iron

[+] Author and Article Information
Khagendra Tripathi

Metals and Materials Engineering Department,
Sun Moon University,
100, Kalsan-ri,
Asan 336-708, South Korea
e-mail: tripathikhagendra25@gmail.com

Bhupendra Joshi

Metals and Materials Engineering Department,
Sun Moon University,
100, Kalsan-ri,
Asan 336-708, South Korea
e-mail: joshibhupen@gmail.com

Gobinda Gyawali

Metals and Materials Engineering Department,
Sun Moon University,
100, Kalsan-ri,
Asan 336-708, South Korea
e-mail: gbngyawali@gmail.com

Auezhan Amanov

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Sun Moon University,
100, Kalsan-ri,
Asan 336-708, South Korea
e-mail: amanov_a@yahoo.com

Soo Wohn Lee

Metals and Materials Engineering Department,
Sun Moon University,
100, Kalsan-ri,
Asan 336-708, South Korea;
Environmental Engineering Department,
Sun Moon University,
100, Kalsan-ri,
Asan 336-708, South Korea
e-mail: swlee@sunmoon.ac.kr

1Corresponding authors.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received December 5, 2014; final manuscript received April 9, 2015; published online August 6, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Daniel Nélias.

J. Tribol 138(1), 011601 (Aug 06, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: TRIB-14-1301; doi: 10.1115/1.4030859 History: Received December 05, 2014

Dimples with various pitches and densities were produced using laser surface texturing (LST) to improve the friction and wear behavior of graphite cast iron. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of dimples on the friction and wear behavior of an internal combustion engine (ICE) cylinder. The specimens with a dimple pitch of 150 μm and a dimple density of 13% exhibited the lowest friction coefficient among the specimens, while the specimens with a dimple pitch of 200 μm and a density of 7% exhibited the highest resistance to wear.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

OM images of untextured and textured specimens before friction test: (a) untextured, (b) S80, (c) S100, (d) S150, and (e) S200, respectively

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Fig. 2

SEM image of cross section of a dimple created on the cast iron specimen

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Fig. 3

Profiles of dimples on textured specimens

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Fig. 4

Variation of friction coefficient untextured and textured specimens as a function of sliding time

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Fig. 5

Effect of (a) normal load and (b) sliding speed on friction coefficient of specimen S150

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Fig. 6

Optical images of wear tracks on untextured and textured specimens: (a) untextured, (b) S80, (c) S100, (d) S150, and (e) S200, respectively

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Fig. 7

Wear track profiles of untextured and textured specimens: (a) untextured, (b) S80, (c) S100, (d) S150, and (e) S200

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Fig. 8

Wear rate of untextured and textured specimens

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Fig. 9

Optical images of wear scar developed on steel balls slid against: (a) untextured, (b) S80, (c) S100, (d) S150, and (e) S200, respectively

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Fig. 10

Ball scar wear profiles slid against untextured and textured specimens

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Fig. 11

Wear volume and rate of counterface balls sliding against untextured and textured specimens

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