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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

Modeling and Optimization of Friction and Wear Characteristics of Ti3Al2.5V Alloy Under Dry Sliding Condition

[+] Author and Article Information
Mukund Dutt Sharma

Mechanical Engineering Department,
National Institute of Technology,
Hamirpur 177005, India
e-mail: mukund.sharma5@gmail.com

Rakesh Sehgal

Professor
Mechanical Engineering Department,
National Institute of Technology,
Hamirpur 177005, India
e-mail: rakeshsehgal.nitham@gmail.com

Mohit Pant

Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering Department,
National Institute of Technology,
Hamirpur 177005, India
e-mail: mohitpant.iitr@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received May 27, 2015; final manuscript received December 2, 2015; published online April 13, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Robert Wood.

J. Tribol 138(3), 031603 (Apr 13, 2016) (18 pages) Paper No: TRIB-15-1169; doi: 10.1115/1.4032518 History: Received May 27, 2015; Revised December 02, 2015

Modeling of dry sliding friction and wear behavior of Ti3Al2.5V alloy sliding against EN31 steel using a multi-tribotester has been presented. Mathematical model equations in the form of natural log transformation for wear rate (WR), average coefficient of friction (μa), and a square root transformation for maximum contact temperature (Tm) considering the effect of tribological variables have been developed and validated by comparing them with the experimental results. The authors claim novelty with regard to modeling and optimization of friction and wear characteristics of Ti-3Al2.5V alloy. The results reveal that the magnitude of wear rate and maximum contact temperature increases with increase in sliding velocity and increasing normal load with few exceptions. Whereas average coefficient of friction first increases with increasing sliding velocity up to 2.51 m/s, and then decreases at highest sliding velocity. The load is found to have strongest influence on both wear rate and average coefficient of friction followed by sliding velocity, whereas sliding velocity has strongest influence on the maximum contact temperature followed by load. The perturbation plot results are also in accordance with the analysis of variance (ANOVA) analysis. The theoretical and experimental results have an average error of 5.06%, 1.78%, and 1.42%, respectively, for wear rate, average coefficient of friction, and maximum contact temperature. Optimization resulted in a maximum desirability of 0.508 at a load of 60 N and a sliding velocity of 1.5 m/s. For these values, the predicted minimum wear rate is 0.0001144 g/m, the coefficient of friction is 0.3181, and the tool-tip temperature is 59.03 °C.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Optical micrograph of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy: (a) before heat treatment and (b) after heat treatment at 200×

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Fig. 2

Experimental setup consists of multi-tribotester operated with winducom 2008 software to link with computer, and in the inset, the contact region is shown

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Fig. 3

Normal plot of residuals for wear rate of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 4

Distribution of residuals over the experimental run order for wear rate of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 5

Predicted versus actual values for wear rate of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 6

Box–Cox plot for power transforms in case of wear rate for Ti3Al2.5V alloy

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Fig. 7

Comparison of theoretical and experimental results for wear rate of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 8

SEM micrograph of wear tracks on Ti3Al2.5 V alloy at 60 N load and 3.142 m/s sliding velocity at (a) 100×, (b) 500×, and (c) 1000×

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Fig. 9

Perturbation plot for wear rate of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 10

Normal plot of residuals for average coefficient of friction of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 11

Distribution of residuals over the experimental run order for average coefficient of friction of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 12

Predicted versus actual values of average coefficient of friction for Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 13

Box–Cox plot for power transforms in case of average coefficient of friction for Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 14

Comparison of theoretical and experimental results for average coefficient of friction of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 15

EDS of wear debris of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy at 60 N load at magnification of 500×

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Fig. 16

Perturbation plot of average coefficient of friction for Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 17

Normal plot of residuals for maximum contact temperature of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 18

Distribution of residuals over the experimental run order for maximum contact temperature of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 19

Predicted versus actual values for maximum contact temperature of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 20

Box–Cox plot for power transforms in case of maximum contact temperature for Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 21

Comparison of theoretical and experimental results for maximum contact temperature of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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Fig. 22

Perturbation plot for maximum contact temperature of Ti3Al2.5 V alloy

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